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That the United States District Attorney engaged in the
prosecution should degrade the dignity of the law by the question (to
Judge Selden) "if it was conceded that on the day of election Miss
Anthony was a woman?" to which the reply was, "Yes, now and ever heart
and soul a woman"; that Judge Hunt should ask her "if she voted as a
female"? to which he got the answer, "No, sir, I voted as a citizen of
the United States"; those questions, I say, were not so much a matter
of surprise under the peculiar forms of the trial, but that a law
journal should so far forget its dignity; should so far descend from
argument, from discussion of law to unseemly banter on the question of
sex; that it should so far stoop from a canvass of the most important
trial that ever took place, to a senile jest on woman, must be matter
of astonishment to every candid mind in the legal fraternity, and
certainly has a tendency to convince the female portion of the country
that the male man is fast losing his right to the definition of "man,
a reasoning animal."

In regard to that editor's expressed desire that the case of Miss
Anthony should have gone to the jury, as they would have brought in a
verdict of guilty, I will inform him that one of those jurymen told me
his verdict would have been "not guilty" had he been allowed by Judge
Hunt to express his opinions, "nor would he have been alone." This was
just what Hunt knew and feared and was determined should not take
place. Therefore he gagged the jury and ordered the verdict of guilty
entered--a verdict which, as this editor acknowledges, was never
rendered.

_Fayetteville, N. Y._ MATILDA JOSLYN GAGE.


ULYSSES S. GRANT,

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

_To all to whom those Presents shall come, Greeting_:

WHEREAS, at the June term, 1873, of the United States Circuit Court of
the Northern District of New York, one Beverly W. Jones, one Edwin T.
Marsh, and one William B. Hall were convicted of illegally registering
certain persons as voters, and receiving their votes, and were
sentenced each to pay a fine of twenty-five dollars,

AND WHEREAS, the Honorable H. A. Sargent asks that they be pardoned,
in view of the peculiar circumstances of their offense,

_Now, therefore_, be it known, that I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of
the United States of America, in consideration of the premises, divers
other good and sufficient reasons me thereunto moving, do hereby grant
to the said Beverly W. Jones, Edwin T. Marsh, and William B. Hall, a
full and unconditional pardon.

_In testimony whereof_, I have hereunto signed my name and caused the
Seal of the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.] Done at the City of Washington, this Third day of March, A.D.
1874, and of the Independence of the United States the
Ninety-eighth.

By the President. U. S. GRANT.

HAMILTON FISH, Secretary of State.


CORRESPONDENCE FROM WASHINGTON--SPECIAL TO THE _COMMONWEALTH_.

WASHINGTON, _April 14, 1874_.

SUSAN ANTHONY'S CASE.

Speaking of women, reminds me that a report will soon be made by the
Judiciary Committee upon the petition of Susan B. Anthony for a
remission of her fine for voting in the last Presidential campaign for
General Grant and Henry Wilson. The friends of woman's suffrage
confidently expect a favorable report upon this subject from the
committee. It was a clear case of a decision by a judge in excess of
his authority, and acting without warrant of law. It will not be a
decision if favorably made into which the right of suffrage will
necessarily enter. Miss Anthony claims her conviction was
unconstitutional under the law, the judge having refused her the right
of trial by jury in that he directed the jury to bring in a verdict of
guilty. She insists that this proceeding of the judge was in
derogation of her legal right of trial by jury, and as by law she had
no appeal in a criminal case from the decision of a single judge, that
it is the duty, as it is in the power, of Congress to remit the fine
which she has been ordered to pay with the costs. This simply involves
a legal question, and one which the Judiciary Committee will be quite
likely to decide in Susan's favor as she has both law and precedent on
her side. If the committee report favorably to the House, it will be
quite likely to pass on its merits as a legal question, giving many
members an opportunity to vote as their sympathies would direct
without committing themselves squarely to the question of woman's
suffrage. It is a step that will pave the way to this in the future.
Mr. Sargent has introduced a similar bill in the Senate, and Senator
Carpenter is pledged not only to its support but announces himself
ready to work for its passage.

The question of whether woman shall vote has become one of live issues
in politics to-day, and must be met by parliaments and people whether
they will or no. Susan B. Anthony, as the pioneer in this crusade,
holds the respectful consideration of a large number of our public
men. They have learned that she is in earnest in the advocacy of equal
rights, social and political, for her sex. She has no other religion
than work for this cause, unless it be war upon what she calls the
male despotism of both church and State. She will have gained in this,
the great cause to which she has consecrated her life, a substantial
victory. Notwithstanding it does not bear directly upon the question
of suffrage, it will be a recognition of the fact that judges can not
with impunity make decisions that woman has no rights that they are
bound to respect, and the rebuke that this remission of her fine, if
ordered by Congress, will be to the judge presiding in her case is one
that his associates throughout the country will be sure to heed. This
will at the same time give courage and hope to the friends of equal
rights to all regardless of race, sex, or previous condition of
servitude.


MINOR vs. HAPPERSETT.

(_Toledo Sunday Journal, April, 1875_,)

We insert to-day a communication from a friend of equal rights, who
highly condemns the interpretation of the Constitution by the Supreme
Court--his opinion also being from a legal standpoint. There is no
doubt but that although the mere letter of the Constitution may be
adhered to, _women_ not being _specified_ as being _people and not
non-entities_, the interpretation is clear behind the spirit of the
Constitution. It is then the manifest duty of Congress, since the
Supreme Court gives the conservative interpretation, to so amend the
Constitution as to bring it up unmistakably to the design of the
framers, which was representation for all the people.


THE GREAT USURPATION.

_President Woman's Suffrage Association, Toledo, Ohio_:

DEAR MADAM: What a fraud is practiced by the administration of this
government upon the provisions of the Constitution of the United
States! As government is administered, the female portion of the
public are defrauded of constitutional right, and made to become
political slaves. Since the beginning, all the way down to the present
day, woman has been debarred of all political privilege, though
reckoned and accounted as one of the people, in matters of census and
taxation. Her disabilities in this behalf were removed by the adoption
of the National Constitution; but nullification of that Constitution
and a high handed usurpation on the part of the States, have ever
hindered the enjoyment of her constitutional rights. But so long as
she is classed by the Constitution as one of the people--so long as
the people are the owners, the proprietors of the government
established by the Constitution--so long as it provides for
self-government, popular sovereignty--so long must she be _entitled_
to take part in administration, though prevented from doing so by fine
and imprisonment.

I am awakened to this subject of woman suffrage by a decision of the
Supreme Court of the United States, made at Washington this week. I
have not seen the text of the opinion read by the Chief Justice, but I
find this statement in the Court news of Monday last:

"No. 182.--Virginia L. Minor agt. Reese Happersett: in error to
Supreme Court of Missouri.--The plaintiff in error instituted an
action against Happersett, who was the judge of an election, for
denying her the right to vote. She based her right to vote upon the
ground that as a citizen of the United States she had that right under
the Constitution. Mr. Chief Justice Waite delivered the opinion,
holding, first, that women are and always have been citizens of the
United States as well as men; second, the Constitution of the United
States does not attach the right of voting to the right of
citizenship; third, nor does the Constitution of any of the States
make the right to vote coextensive with citizenship; fourth,
consequently, women are not entitled to vote by virtue of the
Constitution of the United States, when the State laws do not give the
right. Affirmed."

The great usurpation is now affirmed, legalized, by the decree of the
Judicial Department of this government! More than 20,000,000 of the
people of this Nation have been declared without the pale of political
rights secured to them by the Constitution of the fathers. This
decision indorses the disfranchisement of every female in the land, so
long endured by her. Her citizenship, which the National Constitution
makes evidence of her copartnership, or tenancy in common, or
proprietorship in the Government, is worthless--is only a name; and
does not enable her to exercise the privileges and immunities of our
system of self-government which that Constitution declares this
government to be--a government by and for its citizens. Woman can not
now exercise her constitutional right--she is only a cipher, important
once in a decade, in numbering the people--she is only a political
slave, a helpless Helot. Make ready, adorn your person, O woman, to
celebrate the coming centennial of the Declaration of American
Independence of the British throne!



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