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This should be a year of great activity among the
women of this State. As New York is to have a constitutional
convention in '67, it behooves us now to make an earnest demand,
by appeals and petitions, to have the word "male" as well as
"white" stricken from our Constitution.

SUSAN B. ANTHONY, presented several resolutions for consideration.

5. _Resolved_, That disfranchisement _in a republic_ is as
great an anomaly, if not cruelty, as slavery itself. It is,
therefore, the solemn duty of Congress, in "_guaranteeing a
republican form of government to every State of this
Union_," to see that there be no abridgment of suffrage
among persons responsible to law, on account of color or
sex.

6. _Resolved_, That the Joint Resolutions and report of the
"Committee of Fifteen," now before Congress, to introduce
the word "_male_" into the Federal Constitution, are a
desecration of the last will and testament of the Fathers, a
violation of the spirit of republicanism, and cruel
injustice to the women of the nation.

7. _Resolved_, That while we return our thanks to those
members of Congress who, recognizing the sacred right of
petition, gave our prayer for the ballot a respectful
consideration, we also remind those who, with scornful
silence laid them on the table, or with flippant
sentimentality pretended to exalt us to the clouds, above
man, the ballot and the work of life, that we consider no
position more dignified and womanly than on an even platform
with man worthy to lay the corner-stone of a republic in
equality and justice.

8. _Resolved_, That we recommend to the women of the several
States to petition their Legislatures to take the necessary
steps to so amend their constitutions as to secure the right
of suffrage to every citizen, without distinction of race,
color or sex; and especially in those States that are soon
to hold their constitutional conventions.

THEODORE TILTON said: According to the programme, it is now my
friend Mr. Beecher's turn to speak, but I observe that this
gentleman, like some of the rest of the President's friends,
occupies a back seat. [Laughter]. While, therefore, he is sitting
under the gallery, I will occupy your attention just long enough
to give that modest man a chance to muster nerve enough to make
his appearance in public. [Laughter]. First of all, I have an
account to settle with Mrs. Stanton. In her speech on taking the
chair, she said that editors are not good housekeepers--a remark
which no editor would think of retorting upon herself.
[Laughter]. But, however dingy my editorial office may sometimes
be, it is always a cheerful place when Mrs. Stanton visits it.
[Applause]. Moreover, I think the place she invited me _out of_
is no darker than this place which she invited me _into_!
[Laughter]. In fact, I think the press has generally as much
illumination as the church. [Applause].

Mrs. President, this convention is called to consider the most
beautiful and humane idea which has ever entered into American
politics--the right of woman to that ballot which belongs equally
to all citizens. What is the chief glory of our democratic
institutions? It is, that they appeal equally to the common
interest of all classes--to high and low, to rich and poor, to
white and black, to male and female. And never, until the
political equality of all these classes is fully recognized by
our laws, shall we have a government truly democratic. The
practical instrument of this equality is the ballot. Now what is
the ballot? Mr. Frothingham gave us one definition; Mr. Phillips
gave us another. But the ballot is so large a thing that it
admits of many definitions. The ballot is what the citizen thinks
of the government. The government looks to the ballot to know the
popular will. I do not mean to say that the little piece of white
paper which we hold in our hand on election day is the only means
whereby we can utter an opinion that shall be heard in
Washington. We can speak by the pen; we can speak by the voice. A
wise government will give heed to the public press, and to the
popular voice. But there is no spoken voice, there is no written
word, which the government is legally bound to heed except the
ballot. When they see the ballot, they know they are served with
official notice. When you _talk_ to a government, you talk as to
a tree; but when you _vote_ at it, you scratch your name on the
bark. Now, I want to see Rosalind's name cut into the bark of the
government. [Applause]. Who ought to possess the ballot? Our
President is right--I mean _this_ President. [Applause]. She does
not claim the ballot for women as women, but for women as
citizens. That is the true ground. The ballot belongs not to the
white man, not to the black man, not to the woman, but to the
citizen. Shall the minister vote? No. Shall the lawyer? No. Shall
the merchant? No. Shall the rich man? No. Shall the poor man? No.
None of these shall vote. There is only one person who shall
vote, and that is the citizen. [Applause]. Now I trust the day is
not far distant when our institutions shall practically recognize
this idea--when civil prerogative shall be limited not only by no
distinction of color, but by no distinction of sex.

Are women politically oppressed that they need the ballot for
their protection? I leave that question to be answered by women
themselves. I demand the ballot for woman, not for woman's sake,
but for man's. _She_ may demand it for her own sake; but to-day,
_I_ demand it for _my_ sake. We shall never have a government
thoroughly permeated with humanity, thoroughly humane, thoroughly
noble, thoroughly trustworthy, until both men and women shall
unite in forming the public sentiment, and in administering that
sentiment through the government. [Applause]. The church needs
woman, society needs woman, literature needs woman, science needs
woman, the arts need woman, politics need woman. [Applause]. A
Frenchman once wrote an essay to prove woman's right to the
alphabet. She took the alphabet, entered literature, and drove
out Dean Swift. When she takes the ballot, and enters politics,
she will drive out Fernando Wood. [Applause]. But, shall we have
a woman for President? I would thank God if to-day we had a _man_
for President. [Laughter]. Shall women govern the country? Queens
have ruled nations from the beginning of time, and woman has
governed man from the foundation of the world! [Laughter]. I know
that Plato didn't have a good opinion of women; but probably they
were not as amiable in his day as in ours. They undoubtedly have
wrought their full share of mischief in the world. The chief bone
of contention among mankind, from the earliest ages down, has
been that rib of Adam out of which God made Eve. [Laughter]. And
I believe in holding women to as great a moral accountability as
men. [Laughter]. I believe, also, in holding them to the same
intellectual accountability. Twenty years ago, when Macaulay sat
down to review Lucy Rushton's--no, I mean Lucy Aiken's (laughter)
"Life of Addison," he was forced to allude to what was a patent
fact, that a woman's book was then to be treated with more
critical leniency than a man's. But criticism nowadays never
thinks of asking whether a book be a woman's or a man's, as a
preliminary to administering praise or blame. In the Academy of
Design, the critic deals as severely with a picture painted by a
woman as with one painted by a man. This is right. Would you have
it otherwise? Not at all! We are to stand upon a common level.

The signs of the times indicate the progress of woman's cause.
Every year helps it forward visibly. The political status of
woman was never so seriously pondered as it is now pondered by
thoughtful minds in this country. By and by, the principles of
Christian democracy will cover the continent--nay, will cover the
world, as the equator belts it with summer heat! [Applause].
Until which time, we are called to diligent and earnest work.
"Learn to labor and to wait," saith the poet. There will be need
of much laboring and of long waiting. Sir William Jones tells us
that the Hindoo laws declared that women should have no political
independence--and there is many a backward Yankee who don't know
any better than to agree with the Hindoos. Salatri, the Italian,
drew a design of Patience--a woman chained to a rock by her
ankles, while a fountain threw a thin stream of water, drop by
drop, upon the iron chain, until the link should be worn away,
and the wistful prisoner be set free. In like manner the
Christian women of this country are chained to the rock of
Burmese prejudice; but God is giving the morning and the evening
dew, the early and the latter rain, until the ancient fetters
shall be worn away, and a disfranchised sex shall leap at last
into political liberty. [Applause]. And now for Mr. Beecher.

MR. BEECHER, on rising, was received with hearty applause,[62] and
spoke for an hour, in a strain of great animation, as follows:

It may be asked why, at such a time as this, when the attention
of the whole nation is concentrated upon the reconstruction of
our States, we should intrude a new and advanced question. I have
been asked "Why not wait for the settlement of the one that now
fills the minds of men?



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