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That instrument recognizes as persons all citizens who obey
the laws and support the State, and if the Constitutions of the
several States were brought into harmony with the broad
principles of the Federal Constitution, the women of the Nation
would no longer be taxed without representation, or governed
without their consent. Not one word should be added to that great
charter of rights to the insult or injury of the humblest of our
citizens. I would gladly have a voice and vote in the Fortieth
Congress to demand _universal_ suffrage, that thus a republican
form of government might be secured to every State in the Union.

If the party now in the ascendency makes its demand for "Negro
Suffrage" in good faith, on the ground of natural right, and
because the highest good of the State demands that the republican
idea be vindicated, on no principle of justice or safety can the
women of the nation be ignored. In view of the fact that the
Freedmen of the South and the millions of foreigners now crowding
our shores, most of whom represent neither property, education,
nor civilization, are all in the progress of events to be
enfranchised, the best interests of the nation demand that we
outweigh this incoming pauperism, ignorance, and degradation,
with the wealth, education, and refinement of the women of the
republic. On the high ground of safety to the Nation, and justice
to citizens, I ask your support in the coming election.

New York, _Oct. 10, 1866_. ELIZABETH CADY STANTON.


The New York _Herald_, though, of course, with no sincerity,
since that journal is never sincere in anything--warmly advocated
Mrs. Stanton's election. "A lady of fine presence and
accomplishments in the House of Representatives," it said (and
said truly), "would wield a wholesome influence over the rough
and disorderly elements of that body." The _Anti-Slavery
Standard_, with genuine commendation, said: "The electors of the
Eighth District would honor themselves and do well by the country
in giving her a triumphant election." The other candidates in the
same district were Mr. James Brooks, Democrat, and Mr. Le Grand
B. Cannon, Republican. The result of the election was as follows:
Mr. Brooks received 13,816 votes, Mr. Cannon 8,210, and Mrs.
Stanton 24. It will be seen that the number of sensible people in
the district was limited! The excellent lady, in looking back
upon her successful defeat, regrets only that she did not, before
it became too late, procure the photographs of her two dozen
unknown friends.[68]

The years of 1866 and '67 were marked by unusual activity among the
friends of this movement in both England and America. John Stuart
Mill, a member of Parliament, proposed an amendment to the "Household
Suffrage Bill," by striking out the word "man," sustained by many able
speeches, which finally carried the measure triumphantly there. New
York held a Constitutional Convention, Michigan a Commission, and
Kansas submitted the proposition of woman suffrage to a vote of her
people. Twenty thousand petitions were rolled up and presented in the
Constitutional Convention, asking that the word "male" be stricken
from Article II, sec. 1, and as many more were poured into Congress
and the Legislatures of several of the States. A series of
conventions, commencing in Albany, were held in all the chief cities
of New York.[69]


THE AMERICAN EQUAL RIGHTS ASSOCIATION.

The labors of this year are well rounded out with a grand National
Convention,[70] during Anniversary week, in New York, which assembled
at the Church of the Puritans, May 9th, 1867, at 10 o'clock A.M.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton called the meeting to order and said: "In the
absence of our venerable President (Lucretia Mott), Robert Purvis, one
of the Vice-Presidents, will take the chair."

Mr. PURVIS said: I regret the absence of Mrs. Mott. It is
needless to say that no one has higher claims upon the nation's
gratitude for what has been accomplished in the glorious work of
Anti-Slavery, and for what is now being accomplished in the still
greater, because more comprehensive work for freedom contemplated
by this Society, than our honored and beloved President, Lucretia
Mott. (Applause). It is with no ordinary feelings that I
congratulate the friends of this Association on the healthful,
hopeful, animating, inspiring signs of the times. Our simple yet
imperative demand, founded upon a just conception of the true
idea of our republican government, is equality of rights for all,
without regard to color, sex, or race; and, inseparable from the
citizen, the possession of that power, that protection, that
primal element of republican freedom--the ballot.

Lucretia Mott here entered the hall, and, at the request of Mr.
Purvis, took the chair, and called for the Secretary's Report.

SUSAN B. ANTHONY said: It is my duty to present to you at this
time a written Report of all that has been done during the past
year; but those of us who have been active in this movement, have
been so occupied in doing the work, that no one has found time to
chronicle the progress of events. With but half a dozen live men
and women, to canvass the State of New York, to besiege the
Legislature and the delegates to the Constitutional Convention
with tracts and petitions, to write letters and send documents to
every State Legislature that has moved on this question, to urge
Congress to its highest duty in the reconstruction, by both
public and private appeals, has been a work that has taxed every
energy and dollar at our command. Money being the vital power of
all movements--the wood and water of the engine--and, as our work
through the past winter has been limited only by the want of it,
there is no difficulty in reporting on finance. The receipts of
our Association, during the year, have amounted to $4,096.78; the
expenditures, for lectures and conventions, for printing and
circulating tracts and documents, to $4,714.11--leaving us in
debt $617.33.

The Secretary then rapidly rehearsed the signs of progress. She
spoke of the discussion in the United States Senate on the
Suffrage bill, through three entire days, resulting in a vote of
nine Senators in favor of extending suffrage to the women as
well as black men of the District of Columbia; of the action of
the Legislatures of Kansas and Wisconsin to strike the words
"white male" from their constitutions; of the discussions and
minority votes in the Legislatures of Maine, Massachusetts, New
York, Ohio, and Missouri; of the addresses of Elizabeth Cady
Stanton and Lucy Stone before the Judiciary Committees of the New
York and New Jersey Legislatures; of the demand for household
suffrage by the women of England, earnestly maintained by John
Stuart Mill in the British Parliament--all showing that the
public mind everywhere is awake on this question of equal rights
to all. Every mail brings urgent requests from the West for
articles for their papers, for lectures and tracts on the
question of suffrage. In Kansas they are planning mass
conventions, to be held throughout the State through September
and October; and they urge us to send out at least a dozen able
men and women, with 100,000 tracts, to help them educate the
people into the grand idea of universal suffrage, that they may
carry the State at the November election.

Two of our agents, Lucy Stone and Henry B. Blackwell, are already
in Kansas, speaking in all her towns and cities--in churches,
school-houses, barns, and the open air; traveling night and day,
by railroad, stage, and ox-cart; scaling the rocky divides, and
fording the swollen rivers--their hearts all aglow with
enthusiasm, greeted everywhere by crowded audiences, brave men
and women, ready to work for the same principles for which they
have suffered in the past, that Kansas, the young and beautiful
hero of the West, may be the first State in the Union to realize
a genuine Republic. The earnest, loyal people of Kansas have
resolved to teach the nation to-day the true principle of
reconstruction, as they taught the nation, twelve years ago, the
one and only way in which to escape from the chains of slavery.
They ask us to help them. So do Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan,
and New York. But for this vast work, as I have already shown
you, we have an empty treasury. We ask you to replenish it. If
you will but give your money generously--if you will but oil the
machinery--this Association will gladly do the work that shall
establish universal suffrage, equal rights to all, in every State
in the Union.

The PRESIDENT (Mrs. Mott) said: The report which we have had,
although not written, is most interesting. A great deal of it is
new to me. There are so many actively engaged in the cause, that
it is fitting that some of us older ones should give place to
them. That is the natural order, and every natural order is
divine and beautiful. Therefore, I feel glad of the
privilege--although my filling the office of President has been a
mere nominal thing--to withdraw from the chair and to yield the
place to our friend Robert Purvis, one of our Vice-Presidents.
The cause is dear to my heart, and has been from my earliest
days. Being a native of the island of Nantucket, where women were
thought something of, and had some connection with the business
arrangements of life, as well as with their homes, I grew up so
thoroughly imbued with woman's rights that it was the most
important question of my life from a very early day.



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