A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
Gage, who watched over their
interests, teaching them to read and work for two long years.
Some on our platform have struggled with hardship and
poverty--been slaves even in "the land of the free and the home
of the brave," and bear the scars of life's battle. But is a
self-made woman less honorable than a self-made man? Answer our
arguments. When the Republic is in danger, no matter for our
manners. When our soldiers came back from the war, wan, weary,
and worn, maimed, halt, blind, wrinkled, and decrepit--their
banners torn, their garments stained with blood--who, with a soul
to feel, thought of anything but the glorious work they had done?
What if their mothers on this platform be angular, old, wrinkled,
and gray? They, too, have fought a good fight for freedom, and
proudly bear the scars of the battle. We alone have struck the
key-note of reconstruction. While man talks of "equal, impartial,
manhood suffrage," we give the certain sound, "universal
suffrage." While he talks of the rights of races, we exalt the
higher, the holier idea proclaimed by the Fathers, and now twice
baptized in blood, "individual rights." To woman it is given to
save the Republic.

SUSAN B. ANTHONY, on behalf of the Executive Committee, reported
several resolutions.[71]

Rev. SAMUEL J. MAY said: I wish to give my testimony most
earnestly and solemnly to the conviction, which has continually
increased in my soul since my attention was first called to the
subject, that this is a fundamental question. How can we expect
that our government will be well conducted when one-half, and
that too what we have been accustomed to call the "better half,"
of its constituency is disfranchised, and unable to influence it
as it should? It is now twenty-two years since I delivered my
first public discourse on this subject; and when I have insisted,
as I have done during that time, that women should be allowed to
take part in the government, it has always been thrown in my
teeth that women were governing the nation after all through
their influence over their husbands, brothers, and sons. I was
delighted with the remarks of Mrs. Stanton on this subject. In
the first place, women can not influence their husbands, nor
educate their sons, as they should do, because they are not
properly informed, and have no inducement to become informed.
Were they to feel a responsibility, doubtless the better part of
them would prepare themselves to discharge their duty; but
knowing that they have nothing to do with the government of the
country, you can hardly persuade our young women to study the
subject. Years ago I insisted that the Constitution of the United
States should be introduced into the common schools of the city
where I live, to be studied by girls as well as boys. Yet I
hardly know half a dozen girls there who have taken the least
interest in it. Why? Because, when any allusion is made to
women's participation in the government, it has been met with a
sneer, which so many dread more than they do a bullet; and this
has doubtless deterred them from it.

I was glad, too, to hear the reply so successfully made to the
objection that women do not demand this right. That is no reason
why they should not be required to exercise it. It is their right
because it is their duty. It is their duty because it is their
right. We have the most glorious inheritance that God ever gave
to a nation, the privilege of governing ourselves. Where does
self-government begin? Where does it reside? In the individual.
No individual that can not govern himself can contribute in the
least toward the government of the country in which he lives. He
becomes a burden, if not a curse. Knowing that women have the
same moral powers as men, the same intellectual powers, the same
affections, that they are governed by the same laws, and amenable
to the same government, who can doubt that if they were made
sensible of their responsibilities in the government of the
country, and that they can not contribute in the least to the
well-being of the community unless they can contribute those
virtues and graces which constitute the true government of one's
self; this would have the most inspiring and elevating influence
upon them? Think you they would continue to be the servants of
mere fashion, as too many of them now are? By our refusal to act
in accordance with the eternal principles of righteousness set
forth in the Declaration of Independence and in the preamble of
the Constitution of the country, we have been brought into a
terrible civil war, which has resulted in a disorganized
condition requiring reconstruction. Why should we not see to it
that our country as a whole, and that each individual State of
the country, shall be reconstructed on this true basis, so that,
if possible, nothing may be left to be done hereafter to improve
the foundations on which this nation rests?

Many say, "One thing at a time. You have been struggling for the
abolition of slavery and obtained that; and now claim the
political rights of the colored men, and will undoubtedly get
them. Why can't you be satisfied?" Because that would leave a
tremendous wrong at the foundation of our country. What will be
the consequence, God only knows, should we dare to go on with
such a fatal mistake in the basis of our institutions. It is
presumption to suppose that we can do this without incurring,
sooner or later, awful consequences. We can not predict what they
will be; but that they will be great our past experiences should
teach us. It was thought a very little matter to leave our
Constitution indefinite as to the rights of colored men. Our
fathers in the meetings held to ratify the Constitution, said
they had done all that could be expected, said that the
death-blow was struck at the institution of slavery, that it
would soon die a natural death; and thus they quieted those who
were distrustful because slavery was not explicitly abolished in
the Constitution. The people, engaged in their various pursuits,
ambitious for office, eager for wealth, let this seed of wrong
become a mighty upas tree that covered our republic all over, and
scattered everywhere its poisonous fruits. Shall we dare to go on
for another period of our national existence knowing that at the
foundation of our government there is a tremendous wrong?

What should the government of a nation be? Ought it not to be as
much as possible like the government of a well-ordered family?
Can you think of any model so good as the divine model set before
us in the family? What would the family be with a father and
without a mother? To whom do you owe the most--your father or
your mother? Who controlled the family most effectually? Some
thirty years ago, being chairman of the Board of Education in my
district, I proposed to put a woman into a school where the male
teachers had been set at nought year after year. It stood the
lowest in rank when she took it; but in less than a month its
character was obviously changed, and at the end of the term it
stood number three in point of character as well as in
scholarship. Men are not governed by the fear of punishment. They
are governed by a strong, persistent manifestation of the
consciousness of a right to govern them; and that is pressed upon
them more effectually by the influence of a mother or a sister
than of a father or a brother. Just so it will be in the
government of our country, when women shall educate and prepare
themselves to take part in that government, with their almost
instinctive perception of the right, the true, and the good.

And if our fathers and mothers were what they might and should
be, the children would be so well trained that they would govern
themselves, and there would be very little need of the
instrumentality of a political organization. If women understood
that it was not only their right, but their duty, to educate
themselves to be citizens of the State, we should have, instead
of the trifling topics which now occupy their attention in our
domestic circles, the consideration of great questions; and
doubtless their finer perceptions often would help to settle
great questions aright; and they who should go forth from that
family circle into the various relations of life, would go
prepared to advocate the right, to illustrate the truth, and at
the ballot-box to give their votes for the true and the right. It
is my first conviction respecting the future well-being of our
country, that it is to be measured exactly by our treatment of
the colored man. My second conviction is that the well-being of
our country never will be effectually provided for until the
better half of humanity is educated and instructed, and required
to take part in the enactment of the laws and in their
administration.

Mrs. Mott then introduced the venerable Sojourner Truth, who was
greeted with loud cheers, after which she said:

My friends, I am rejoiced that you are glad, but I don't know how
you will feel when I get through. I come from another field--the
country of the slave. They have got their liberty--so much good
luck to have slavery partly destroyed; not entirely. I want it
root and branch destroyed. Then we will all be free indeed. I
feel that if I have to answer for the deeds done in my body just
as much as a man, I have a right to have just as much as a man.
There is a great stir about colored men getting their rights, but
not a word about the colored women; and if colored men get their
rights, and not colored women theirs, you see the colored men
will be masters over the women, and it will be just as bad as it
was before.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.