A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
If it is right for woman to have the suffrage, it is
not right to talk of expediency. If giving woman the ballot will
cause her to lose her prestige, it is because she ought to lose
it. If she gains physical strength and loses that effeminate
delicacy that provides for nothing and cares for nothing but its
own selfish, quiet enjoyment, I shall rejoice with joy
unspeakable. My strong hands have tilled the fields; and in my
early childhood have harnessed the horse, and brought the wood to
the door; have led him to the blacksmith's shop to be shod. These
are things I do not often tell in public. I have braved public
opinion; I have tilled my garden; I have brought myself up from
fainting weakness occasioned by accident and broken bones. I have
taken care of myself, supported myself, and asked nothing from
the world; I find my womanhood not one bit degraded. (Applause).
A thousand times in the last years, in this struggle for bread,
have I been asked, "Why don't you let your sons support you?" My
answer is, "My six sons have their own duties. My six boys have
their own labors. God gives me strength to earn my own bread, and
I will do it as long as I can." (Applause). That is what I want
to teach the womanhood of the country. I did not mean to talk so
long; but I assure you I talk in earnest. If I sometimes, by a
slip of the tongue, make some little mistake--for I have not been
educated in the schools, (a log cabin schoolhouse in the
wilderness gave me all I have)--you will excuse me, for I mean no
injustice to any one. And if to-night it will not crowd some
better woman or man from the platform, I shall be glad to speak
to you again.

Mrs. MOTT.--The argument that has been made that women do not
want to vote is like that which we had to meet in the early days
of the Anti-Slavery enterprise, that the slaves did not want to
be free. I remember that in one of our earliest Woman's Rights
Conventions, in Syracuse, a resolution was offered to the effect
that as the assertion that the slave did not want his freedom,
and would not take it if offered to him, only proved the depth of
his degradation, so the assertion that woman had all the rights
she wanted only gave evidence how far the influence of the law
and customs, and the perverted application of the Scriptures, had
encircled and crushed her. This was fifteen or twenty years ago.
Times are altered since. In the temperance reformation, and in
the great reformatory movements of our age, woman's powers have
been called into action. They are beginning to see that another
state of things is possible for them, and they are beginning to
demand their rights. Why should this church be granted for such a
meeting as this, but for the progress of the cause? Why are so
many women present, ready to respond to the most ultra and most
radical sentiments here, but that woman has grown and is able to
assume her rights?

In many of the States the laws have been so modified that the
wife now stands in a very different position as regards the right
of property and other rights, from that which she occupied
fifteen or twenty years ago. You see the same advance in the
literary world. I remember when Maria Edgeworth and her sister
first published their works, that they were afraid to publish
their own name, and borrowed the name of their father. So Frances
Power Cobbe was not able to write over her own name, and she
issued her "Intuitive Morals" without a name; and her father was
so much pleased with the work, without knowing it was his
daughter's, that it led to an acknowledgment after a while.

STEPHEN S. FOSTER: Will you give us the evidence that the
statement that the women of this country do not want the ballot
is not true? I should be glad to believe that; but in my
experience the worst opposition to the progress of Woman's Rights
has come from woman herself. The greatest indifference to the
cause is to be found among women, and not among men. I wish it
were not so. I hope I am mistaken. But I believe nine out of
every ten of our public speakers will tell you that they find
more help, more sympathy from men than from women.

Rev. S. J. MAY: I should like to have that question settled, so
far as the women present are concerned. Will as many of you as
_will vote_ when the right is awarded to you, please to manifest
it by rising.

Nearly the whole of the ladies present immediately arose. Indeed,
those on the platform, could not see a single woman who retained her
seat.

Mrs. GAGE: During the last fifteen years, with the utmost
industry I could use in ascertaining the public opinion in this
country, I have never found one solitary instance of a woman,
whom I could meet alone by her fireside, where there was no fear
of public opinion, or the minister, or the law-maker, or her
father, or her husband, who did not tell me she would like to
vote. [Applause]. I never found a slave in my life, who, removed
from the eye of the people about him, would not tell me he wanted
liberty--never one. I have been in the slave States for years. I
have been in the slave-pens, and upon the plantations, and have
stood beside the slave as he worked in the sugar cane and the
cotton-field; and I never found one who dared in the presence of
white men to say he wanted freedom. When women and young girls
are asked if they want to vote, they are almost always in just
that situation where they are afraid to speak what they think;
and no wonder they so often say they do not want to vote.


EVENING SESSION.

The meeting was called to order by the President, Mrs. Mott, who
introduced as the first speaker Col. Charles E. Moss, of Missouri.

Mr. MOSS said: This is a subject upon which I have thought for a
number of years; and I have become fully convinced that no reason
can be assigned for extending the right of suffrage to any of the
male sex, that does not equally apply to the female.

When our fathers formed the national Constitution, they made it
their duty to secure to every State a republican form of
government. No government can be republican in form, unless it is
so in substance and in fact; based upon the consent of the
governed. After the troublesome war we have just passed through,
we are called upon not only to reconstruct the ten unrepresented
States of the nation, but to purify the republicanism of our
government in the Northern States and make it more consistent
with our professions. It is a fit time, then, to take up the
subject of suffrage, and to base it upon a well-established
principle. Some say that the right of suffrage is a privilege, to
be given or withheld at pleasure. That does not seem to me a very
safe foundation for so important a right. It is either a
privilege or a natural right. If we recognize it as a natural
right we have a peaceable, safe, legal mode of resistance against
the disfranchisement of the people. If we admit it to be a
privilege to be granted or withheld, no man and no woman has any
legal right to interpose any objection to his own
disfranchisement. But I see that our friend has come in who was
expected first to address you, and I will not take up more of
your time.

PARKER PILLSBURY was next introduced and said: The resolutions
just read refer to the comparative longevity of nations and of
individual men, and of their respective performance, while
existence lasts.

Among nations have arisen Franklins and Washingtons, Humboldts
and Howards; but what individual nation of any period has been
the Plato or Pythagoras, the Howard or the Humboldt of all the
rest? or has achieved proportionally, so long a life? or expired
at last in sunsets of serenity and glory, and been embalmed and
enshrined in the tears and gratitude of mankind? It is often said
that the life of a nation is as the life of an individual; with
beginning, progress, decay, and dissolution. But the resemblance
holds only in part. Consciousness comes to an individual, and
self-respect; and from that hour growth and greatness (it may be)
begin. But with nations it is not so. The world has not made the
same demand of nations as of individuals, and so nothing is
expected of them. Nations, hitherto, were badly brought up. In
the light of a thousand years hence, the eighteenth and
nineteenth centuries will be "darker ages" than the eighth and
ninth are to-day. Accepting three-score and ten as the common
life of an individual, a degree at least of honorable manhood is
often achieved, both in personal virtues, and in noble
performance.

The canticles of the Almanac used to run:

At ten, a child; at twenty, wild;
At thirty, strong, if ever;
At forty, wise; at fifty, rich;
At sixty, good, or never.

But at what age has any nation of any period or place become
wise, rich, or even strong; to say nothing of good?

The Roman Catholic Church is older than any civilized government
on the globe. Lord Macaulay says:

It is the only institution left standing which carries the
mind back to the time when the smoke of sacrifice rose from
the Pantheon, and when tigers and camel leopards bounded in
the Flavian Amphitheatre. The proudest royal houses are but
of yesterday, compared with the line of the supreme
Pontiffs, traced back in unbroken series, from the Pope who
crowned Napoleon in the nineteenth century, to the Pope who
crowned Pepin in the eighth; and far beyond stretches the
august dynasty, until it fades into the twilight of fable!
She saw the commencement of all the governments on the
globe, and of all the ecclesiastical establishments now
existing; and there is no assurance that she is not destined
to see the end of them all!"

The world has an accepted chronology of six thousand years.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.