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Mott also suggested very strongly, and a
million or more of them added to the present opposition and
indifference, are not a slight consideration. Mrs. Stanton does
not believe in loving her neighbor _better_ than herself. Justice
to one class does not mean injustice to another. Woman has as
good a right to the ballot as the black man--no better. Were I a
colored man, and had reason to believe that should woman obtain
her rights she would use them to the prejudice of mine, how could
I labor very zealously in her behalf? It should be enough for Mr.
Downing and all who stand with him that Mrs. Stanton does not
demand one thing for herself as to rights, or time of obtaining
them, which she does not cheerfully, earnestly demand for all
others, regardless of color or sex.

Miss ANTHONY read the following telegram from Lucy Stone:

"ATCHISON, KANSAS, May 10, 1867.

"Impartial Suffrage, _without regard to color or sex_, will
succeed by overwhelming majorities. Kansas leads the world!
LUCY STONE."

Miss ANTHONY also read a hopeful and interesting letter from Hon.
S. N. Wood, of Kansas, showing his plans for the canvass of that
State.

JOSEPHINE GRIFFING said: I am well satisfied that this Convention
ought not to adjourn until a similar plan is laid out for all the
States in the Union, and especially for the District of Columbia.
This being a national convention, it seems peculiarly appropriate
that it should begin its work at the District of Columbia. The
proposition has already been made there, and the parties have
discussed its merits. The question of the franchise arose from
the great fact that at the South there were four millions of
people unrepresented. The fact of woman's being also
unrepresented is now becoming slowly understood. It is easier now
to talk and act upon that subject in the District of Columbia
than ever before, or than it will be again. Even the President
has said that if woman in the District of Columbia shall
intelligently ask for the right of franchise, he shall by no
means veto it. To my mind the enfranchisement of woman is a
settled fact. We can not reconstruct this government until the
franchise shall be given not merely to the four millions but to
the fifteen millions. We can not successfully reconstruct our
government unless we go to the foundation. Let us apply all the
force we can to the lever, for we have a great body to lift. No
matter how ready the public is, we can accomplish nothing unless
we have some plan, and unless we have workers. I presume none of
us are aware how many laws there are upon the statute books
disabling our rights. When the Judges in the District of Columbia
were to decide who were to vote and who were not to vote, the
question arose who could be appointed officers of the city; and
it was found that there was a law that no one could be appointed
a judge of elections who had not paid a tax upon real estate in
the District of Columbia, a law which almost defeats all the work
which has been done during the canvass of the last eight weeks in
that District. There is work yet to be done there, and so we
shall find it at every step. I am thankful with all my heart and
soul that the people have at last consented to the
enfranchisement of two millions of black men. I recognize that,
as the load is raised one inch, we must work by degrees,
accepting every inch, every hair's breadth gained toward the
right. I welcome the enfranchisement of the negro as a step
toward the enfranchisement of woman.

Miss ANTHONY said we seem to be blessed with telegrams, with
cheering news from Kansas, and read the following from S. N.
Wood:

ATCHISON, KANSAS, May 10, 1867.

"With the help of God and Lucy Stone, we shall carry Kansas!
The world moves! SAM WOOD."

These telegrams were received with much applause. The resolutions
were then put to vote, and unanimously carried, and officers were
elected for the ensuing year.[73]

SOJOURNER TRUTH was called for and said: I am glad to see that
men are getting their rights, but I want women to get theirs, and
while the water is stirring I will step into the pool. Now that
there is a great stir about colored men's getting their rights is
the time for women to step in and have theirs. I am sometimes
told that "Women aint fit to vote. Why, don't you know that a
woman had seven devils in her: and do you suppose a woman is fit
to rule the nation?" Seven devils aint no account; a man had a
legion in him. [Great laughter]. The devils didn't know where to
go; and so they asked that they might go into the swine. They
thought that was as good a place as they came out from. [Renewed
laughter]. They didn't ask to go into sheep--no, into the hog;
that was the selfishest beast; and man is so selfish that he has
got women's rights and his own too, and yet he won't give women
their rights. He keeps them all to himself. If a woman did have
seven devils, see how lovely she was when they were cast out, how
much she loved Jesus, how she followed Him. When the devils were
gone out of the man, he wanted to follow Jesus, too, but Jesus
told him to go home, and didn't seem to want to have him round.
And when the men went to look for Jesus at the sepulchre they
didn't stop long enough to find out whether he was there or not;
but Mary stood there and waited, and said to Him, thinking it was
the gardener, "Tell me where they have laid Him and I will carry
Him away." See what a spirit there is. Just so let women be true
to this object, and the truth will reign triumphant.

ALFRED H. LOVE (President of the Universal Peace Society) said:
Your President paid the Universal Peace Society two visits; and
some of us, in turn, are here to reciprocate. The Universal Peace
Society, knowing that we must have purity before we can have
peace, knowing that we need our mothers, wives, and daughters
with us, knowing that we need the morality, the courage, and the
patience of the colored man with us, adopted as our first
resolution that the ballot is a peacemaker, and that with
equality there can be no war; and in another resolution we have
said that women and colored men are entitled to the ballot.
Therefore, you have us upon the same platform, working for you in
the best way we can. We mean no cowardly peace; we mean such a
peace as demands justice and equality, and world-wide
philanthropy. I put the ballot of to-day under my foot, and say I
can not use it until the mother that reared me can have the same
privilege; until the colored man, who is my equal, can have it.

E. H. HEYWOOD of Boston, said he could hardly see what business
men had upon this platform, considering how largely responsible
they are for the conditions against which women struggle, except
to confess their sins. Men had usurped the government, and shut
up women in the kitchen. It was a sad fact that woman did not
speak for herself. It was because she was crowded so low that
she could not speak. Woman wanted not merely the right to vote,
but the right to labor. The average life of the factory girl in
Lowell was only four years, as shown by a legislative
investigation. New avenues for labor must be opened. It is said
that the women on this platform are coquetting with the
Democrats. Why shouldn't they? The Democrats say, "Talk of negro
suffrage, and then refuse women the right to vote. All I have to
say is, when the negroes of Connecticut go to the polls, my wife
and daughter will go, too."


EVENING SESSION.

The meeting was called to order by Mrs. Stanton.

Miss Anthony read another letter from Hon. S. N. Wood, of Kansas,
received since the Morning Session.

FRANCES D. GAGE was then introduced: It is not to-day as it was
before the war. It is not to-day as it was before woman took her
destiny in her hand and went out upon the battle-fields, and into
the camp, and endured hunger and cold for the sake of her
country. The whole country has been vitalized by this war. What
if woman did not carry the bayonet on the battle-field? She
carried that which gave more strength and energy. Traveling
through Illinois, I saw the women bind the sheaf, bring in the
harvest and plow the fields, that men might fight the battles.
When such women come up now and ask for the right of suffrage,
who will deny their request? In the winter of 1860, the law was
passed in New York giving to married women the right to their own
earnings. It was said frequently then that women did not want the
right to their own earnings. We were asked if we wanted to create
separation in families. But did any revolution or any special
trouble grow out of this recognition of woman's right? You see
women everywhere to-day earnestly striving to find a place to
earn their bread. Madame Demorest has become a leader of fashion,
teaching women to make up what Stewart imports; and she has a
branch establishment in every large city in the Union clear to
Montana. I do not know but some of those ladies cutting out
garments, and setting the fashions of the day, might aspire to
the Presidential chair; and perhaps they would be quite as
capable as the present incumbent--a tailor. [Applause].

Three years ago I found myself without the means of life. I
wanted a home.



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