A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
In the action of Congress extending the right of suffrage to
the colored men of the States lately in rebellion, and in the very
long and able discussion of woman's equal right to the ballot in the
United States Senate, and the vote upon it. 2. In the action of the
Legislatures of Kansas and Wisconsin, submitting to the people a
proposition to extend the ballot to woman. 3. In the agitation upon
the same measure in the Legislatures of several other States. 4. In
the friendly tone of so large a portion of the press, both political
and religious; and finally, in the general awaking to the importance
of human elevation and enfranchisement, abroad as well as at home;
particularly in Great Britain, Russia, and Brazil; and encouraged by
past successes and the present prospect, we pledge ourselves to
renewed and untiring exertions, until equal suffrage and citizenship
are acknowledged throughout our entire country, irrespective of sex or
color.

[73] President, Lucretia Mott; Vice-presidents, Elizabeth Cady
Stanton, N. Y., Frederick Douglass, N. Y., Henry Ward Beecher, N. Y.,
Charles Lenox Remond, Mass., Elizabeth B. Chace, R. I., C. Prince,
Conn., Frances D. Gage, N. J., Robert Purvis, Penn., Josephine S.
Griffing, D. C., Thomas Garret, Del., Stephen H. Camp, Ohio, Euphemia
Cochrane, Mich., Mary A. Livermore, Ill., Mrs. Isaac H. Sturgeon, Mo.,
Amelia Bloomer, Iowa, Sam N. Wood, Kansas, Virginia Penny, Kentucky;
Recording Secretaries, Henry B. Blackwell, Hattie Purvis;
Corresponding Secretaries, Susan B. Anthony, Mattie Griffith, Caroline
M. Severance; Treasurer, John F. Merritt; Executive Committee,
Ernestine L. Rose, Edwin A. Studwell, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Martha
C. Wright, Lucy Stone, Parker Pillsbury, Elizabeth Gay, Theodore
Tilton, Mary F. Gilbert, Edward S. Bunker, Antoinette Brown Blackwell,
Susan B. Anthony, Margaret E. Winchester, Aaron M. Powell, James
Haggarty, George T. Downing.

[74] The night before Dr. Cheever was to preach his farewell sermon to
his people in the Church of the Puritans, Miss Anthony and Mrs.
Stanton, walking slowly up Broadway arm in arm, cogitating, as usual,
where a good word could be said for woman, bethought themselves of the
Doctor's forthcoming sermon. As he had fought a grand battle for
anti-slavery in his church, they felt that it would be peculiarly
fitting for him, in his last sermon, to make some mention of the
rights of women.

Accordingly they turned into University Place, and soon found
themselves in his parlor, where they were heartily welcomed by Mrs.
Cheever. Miss Anthony, who was generally the spokesman on all
audacious errands, said, "We want to see the Doctor just five minutes;
we know that it is Saturday evening, that he is busy with his sermon,
and sees no one at this time, but our errand is one of momentous
importance, and what we have in our minds must be said now or never.
While we were explaining to Mrs. Cheever, the folding doors quietly
rolled back, and there stood the Doctor. He laughed heartily when we
made known our mission, and said, "I have the start of you this time;
what you ask is already written in my sermon; come into my library and
you shall hear it. We listened with great satisfaction, expressed our
thanks and started, when Miss A. suddenly turned and said, "That is
excellent, Doctor, now pray do not forget to give it with unction
to-morrow."

Many wondered that Dr. Cheever, a rigid blue Presbyterian, should
express such radical sentiments on so unpopular a reform. But his
conversion was due, no doubt, to the fact that the women of his church
had nobly sustained him all through his anti-slavery battle while the
wealth and conservatism of the congregation forbade the discussion of
that subject in the pulpit. The votes of the women, year after year,
secured his position, until his failing health ended the contest, and
the sale of the edifice changed the Church of the Puritans into
Tiffany's brilliant jewelry establishment.

[75] MEMORIAL OF THE AMERICAN EQUAL RIGHTS ASSOCIATION TO THE CONGRESS
OF THE UNITED STATES.

The undersigned, Officers and Representatives of the American Equal
Rights Association, respectfully but earnestly protest against any
change in the Constitution of the United States, or legislation by
Congress, which shall longer violate the principle of Republican
Government, by proscriptive distinctions in rights of suffrage or
citizenship, on account of color or sex. Your Memorialists would
respectfully represent, that neither the colored man's loyalty,
bravery on the battle field and general good conduct, nor woman's
heroic devotion to liberty and her country, in peace and war, have yet
availed to admit them to equal citizenship, even in this enlightened
and republican nation.

We believe that humanity is one in all those intellectual, moral and
spiritual attributes, out of which grow human responsibilities. The
Scripture declaration is, "so God created man in his own image: male
and female created he them." And all divine legislation throughout the
realm of nature recognizes the perfect equality of the two conditions.
For male and female are but different conditions. Neither color nor
sex is ever discharged from obedience to law, natural or moral;
written or unwritten. The commands, thou shalt not steal, nor kill,
nor commit adultery, know nothing of sex in their demands; nothing in
their penalty. And hence we believe that all _human_ legislation which
is at variance with the divine code, is essentially unrighteous and
unjust. Woman and the colored man are taxed to support many literary
and humane institutions, into which they never come, except in the
poorly paid capacity of menial servants. Woman has been fined,
whipped, branded with red-hot irons, imprisoned and hung; but when was
woman ever tried by a jury of her peers?

Though the nation declared from the beginning that "all just
governments derive their power from the consent of the governed," the
consent of woman was never asked to a single statute, however nearly
it affected her dearest womanly interests or happiness. In the
despotisms of the old world, of ancient and modern times, woman,
profligate, prostitute, weak, cruel, tyrannical, or otherwise, from
Semiramis and Messalina, to Catherine of Russia and Margaret of Anjou,
have swayed, unchallenged, imperial scepters; while in this republican
and Christian land in the nineteenth century, woman, intelligent,
refined in every ennobling gift and grace, may not even vote on the
appropriation of her own property, or the disposal and destiny of her
own children. Literally she has no _rights_ which man is bound to
respect; and her civil privileges she holds only by sufferance. For
the power that gave, can take away, and of that power she is no part.
In most of the States, these unjust distinctions apply to woman, and
to the colored man alike. Your Memorialists fully believe that the
time has come when such injustice should cease.

Woman and the colored man are loyal, patriotic, property-holding,
tax-paying, liberty-loving citizens; and we can not believe that sex
or complexion should be any ground for civil or political degradation.
In our government, one-half the citizens are disfranchised by their
sex, and about one-eighth by the color of their skin; and thus a large
majority have no voice in enacting or executing the laws they are
taxed to support and compelled to obey, with the same fidelity as the
more favored class, whose usurped prerogative it is to rule. Against
such outrages on the very name of republican freedom, your
memorialists do and must ever protest. And is not our protest
pre-eminently as just against the tyranny of "_taxation without
representation_," as was that thundered from Bunker Hill, when our
revolutionary fathers fired the shot that shook the world?

And your Memorialists especially remember, at this time, that our
country is still reeling under the shock of a terrible civil war, the
legitimate result and righteous retribution of the vilest slave system
ever suffered among men. And in restoring the foundations of our
nationality, your memorialists most respectfully and earnestly pray
that all discriminations on account of sex or race may be removed; and
that our Government may be republican in _fact_ as well as _form_; A
GOVERNMENT BY THE PEOPLE, AND THE WHOLE PEOPLE; FOR THE PEOPLE, AND
THE WHOLE PEOPLE.

In behalf of the American Equal Rights Association,

THEODORE TILTON, }
FREDERICK DOUGLAS, } Vice-Presidents.
ELIZABETH CADY STANTON, }

LUCRETIA MOTT, President.
SUSAN B. ANTHONY, Secretary.




CHAPTER XIX.

THE KANSAS CAMPAIGN--1867.

The Battle Ground of Freedom--Campaign of 1867--Liberals did not
Stand by their Principles--Black Men Opposed to Woman
Suffrage--Republican Press and Party Untrue--Democrats in
Opposition--John Stuart Mill's Letters and Speeches Extensively
Circulated--Henry B. Blackwell and Lucy Stone Opened the
Campaign--Rev. Olympia Brown Followed--60,000 Tracts
Distributed--Appeal Signed by Thirty-one Distinguished
Men--Letters from Helen E. Starrett, Susan E. Wattles, Dr. R. S.
Tenney, Lieut. Governor J. P. Root, Rev. Olympia Brown--The
Campaign closed by ex-Governor Robinson, Elizabeth Cady Stanton,
Susan B. Anthony, and the Hutchinson Family--Speeches and Songs
at the Polls in every Ward in Leavenworth Election Day--Both
Amendments lost--9,070 Votes for Woman Suffrage, 10,843 for Negro
Suffrage.


As Kansas was the historic ground where Liberty fought her first
victorious battles with Slavery, and consecrated that soil forever to
the freedom of the black race, so was it the first State where the
battle for woman's enfranchisement was waged and lost for a
generation. There never was a more hopeful interest concentrated on
the legislation of any single State, than when Kansas submitted the
two propositions to her people to take the words "white" and "male"
from her Constitution.

Those awake to the dignity and power of the ballot in the hands of all
classes, to the inspiring thought of self-government, were stirred as
never before, both in Great Britain and America, upon this question.
Letters from John Stuart Mill and other friends, with warm words of
encouragement, were read to thousands of audiences, and published in
journals throughout the State.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.