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Eastern women who went there to speak
started with the full belief that their hopes so long deferred were at
last to be realized. Some even made arrangements for future homes on
that green spot where at last the sons and daughters of earth were to
stand equal before the law. With no greater faith did the crusaders of
old seize their shields and start on their perilous journey to wrest
from the infidel the Holy Sepulcher, than did these defenders of a
sacred principle enter Kansas, and with hope sublime consecrate
themselves to labor for woman's freedom; to roll off of her soul the
mountains of sorrow and superstition that had held her in bondage to
false creeds, and codes, and customs for centuries. There was a solemn
earnestness in the speeches of all who labored in that campaign. Each
heart was thrilled with the thought that the youngest civilization in
the world was about to establish a government based on the divine
idea--the equality of all mankind--proclaimed by Jesus of Nazareth,
and echoed by the patriots who watched the dawn of the natal day of
our Republic. Here at last the mothers of the race, the most important
actors in the grand drama of human progress were for the first time to
stand the peers of men.

These women firmly believed that Republicans and Abolitionists who had
advocated their cause for years would aid them in all possible efforts
to carry the Constitutional Amendment that was to enfranchise the
women of the State. They looked confidently for encouragement, and
inspiring editorials in certain Eastern journals. With Horace Greeley
at the head of the _New York Tribune_, Theodore Tilton of the
_Independent_, and Wendell Phillips of the _Anti-Slavery Standard_,
they felt they had a strong force in the press of the East to rouse
the men of Kansas to their duty. But, alas! they all preserved a
stolid silence, and the Liberals of the State were in a measure
paralyzed by their example. Though the amendment to take the word
"male" from the Constitution was a Republican measure, signed by a
Republican Governor, and advocated by leading men of that party
throughout the campaign, yet the Republican party, as such, the
Abolitionists and black men were all hostile to the proposition,
because they said to agitate the woman's amendment would defeat negro
suffrage.

Eastern politicians warned the Republicans of Kansas that "negro
suffrage" was a party measure in national politics, and that they must
not entangle themselves with the "woman question." On all sides came
up the cry, this is "the negro's hour." Though the Republican State
Central Committee adopted a resolution leaving all their party
speakers free to express their individual sentiments, yet they
selected men to canvass the State, who were known to be unscrupulous
and disreputable, and violently opposed to woman suffrage.[76] The
Democratic party[77] was opposed to both amendments and to the new law
on temperance, which it was supposed the women would actively support.

The Germans in their Conventions passed a resolution[78] against the
new law that required the liquor dealers to get the signatures of
one-half the women, as well as the men, to their petitions before the
authorities could grant them license. In suffrage for women they saw
rigid Sunday laws and the suppression of their beer gardens. The
liquor dealers throughout the State were bitter and hostile to the
woman's amendment. Though the temperance party had passed a favorable
resolution[79] in their State Convention, yet some of their members
were averse to all affiliations with the dreaded question, as to them,
what the people might drink seemed a subject of greater importance
than a fundamental principle of human rights. Intelligent black men,
believing the sophistical statements of politicians, that their rights
were imperiled by the agitation of woman suffrage, joined the
opposition. Thus the campaign in Kansas was as protracted as many
sided.

From April until November, the women of Kansas, and those who came to
help them, worked with indomitable energy and perseverance. Besides
undergoing every physical hardship, traveling night and day in
carriages, open wagons, over miles and miles of the unfrequented
prairies, climbing divides, and through deep ravines, speaking in
depots, unfinished barns, mills, churches, school-houses, and the open
air, on the very borders of civilization, where-ever two or three
dozen voters could be assembled.

Henry B. Blackwell and Lucy Stone opened the campaign in April. The
following letters show how hopeful they were of success, and how
enthusiastically they labored to that end. Even the New York _Tribune_
prophesied victory.[80]


AT GOV. ROBINSON'S HOUSE, FOUR MILES NORTH OF
LAWRENCE, KANSAS, _April, 5, 1867_.

DEAR MRS. STANTON:--We report good news! After half a day's
earnest debate, the Convention at Topeka, by an almost unanimous
vote, refused to separate "the two questions" male and white. A
delegation from Lawrence came up specially to get the woman
dropped. The good God upset a similar delegation from Leavenworth
bent on the same object, and prevented them from reaching Topeka
at all. Gov. Robinson, Gov. Root, Col. Wood, Gen. Larimer, Col.
Ritchie, and "the old guard" generally were on hand. Our coming
out did good. Lucy spoke with all her old force and fire. Mrs.
Nichols was there--a strong list of permanent officers was
nominated--and a State Impartial Suffrage Association was
organized. The right men were put upon the committees, and I do
not believe that the Negro Suffrage men can well bolt or back out
now.

The effect is wonderful. Papers which have been ridiculing woman
suffrage and sneering at "Sam Wood's Convention" are now on our
side. We have made the present Gov. Crawford President of the
Association, Lieut.-Gov. Green Vice-President. Have appointed a
leading man in every judicial district member of the Executive
Committee, and have some of the leading Congregational, Old
School, and New School Presbyterian ministers committed for both
questions; have already secured a majority of the newspapers of
the State, and if Lucy and I succeed in "getting up steam" as we
hope in Lawrence, Wyandotte, Leavenworth, and Atchison, the woman
and the negro will rise or fall together, and shrewd politicians
say that with proper effort we shall carry both next fall.

During the Convention Lucy got a dispatch from Lawrence as
follows: "Will you lecture for the Library Association? State
terms, time, and subject." Lucy replied: "Will lecture Saturday
evening; subject, 'Impartial Suffrage'; terms, one hundred
dollars, payable to Kansas State Impartial Suffrage Association."
The prompt reply was: "We accept your terms." Gen. Larimer, of
Leavenworth, went down next day to try to arrange a similar
lyceum meeting there. In the afternoon came a dispatch from D. R.
Anthony, saying: "Meeting arranged for Tuesday night." This is
especially good, because we were informed that he had somewhat
favored dropping the woman, but whether this was so or not, he
will now be all right as befits the brother of Susan B. Anthony.

We are announced to speak every night but Sundays from April 7 to
May 5 inclusive. We shall have to travel from twenty to forty
miles per day. If our voices and health hold out, Col. Wood says
the State is safe. We had a rousing convention--three
sessions--at Topeka, and a crowded meeting the night following.
We find a very strong feeling against Col. S. N. Wood among
politicians, but they all respect and dread him. He has warmer
friends and bitterer enemies than almost any man in the State.
But he is true as steel. My judgment of men is rarely deceived,
and I pronounce S. N. Wood a great man and a political genius.
Gov. Robinson is a masterly tactician, cool, wary, cautious,
decided, and brave as a lion. These two men alone would suffice
to save Kansas. But when you add the other good and true men who
are already pledged, and the influences which have been combined,
I think you will see next fall an avalanche vote--"the caving in
of that mighty sandbank" your husband once predicted on a similar
occasion.

Now, Mrs. Stanton, you and Susan and Fred. Douglass must come to
this State early next September; you must come prepared to make
_sixty speeches_ each. You must leave your notes _behind you_.
These people won't have written sermons. And you don't want
notes. You are a natural orator, and these people will give you
inspiration! Everything has conspired to help us in this State.
Gov. Robinson and Sam. Wood have quietly set a ball in motion
which nobody in Kansas is now strong enough to stop. Politicians'
hair here is fairly on end. But the fire is in the prairie behind
them, and they are getting out their matches in self-defense to
fire their foreground. This is a glorious country, Mrs. S., and a
glorious people. If we succeed here, it will be the State of the
Future.

With kind regards, HENRY B. BLACKWELL.

P. S.--So you see we have the State Convention committed to the
right side, and I do believe we shall carry it. All the old
settlers are for it. It is only the later comers who say, "If I
were a black man I should not want the woman question hitched to
me." These men tell what their wives have done, and then ask,
shall such women be left without a vote? L. S.


D. R. ANTHONY'S HOUSE, LEAVENWORTH, }
_April 10, 1867_. }

DEAR MRS. STANTON:--We came here just in the nick of time. The
papers were laughing at "Sam Wood's Convention," the call for
which was in the papers with the names of Beecher, Tilton, Ben
Wade, Gratz Brown, E.



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