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L. S.


D. R. ANTHONY'S HOUSE, LEAVENWORTH, }
_April 10, 1867_. }

DEAR MRS. STANTON:--We came here just in the nick of time. The
papers were laughing at "Sam Wood's Convention," the call for
which was in the papers with the names of Beecher, Tilton, Ben
Wade, Gratz Brown, E. C. Stanton, Anna Dickinson, Lucy Stone,
etc., as persons expected or invited to be at the convention. The
papers said: "This is one of Sam's shabbiest tricks. Not one of
these persons will be present, and he knows it," etc., etc. Our
arrival set a buzz going, and when I announced you and Susan and
Aunt Fanny for the fall, they began to say "they guessed the
thing would carry." Gov. Robinson said he could not go to the
Topeka Convention, for he had a lawsuit involving $1,000 that was
to come off that very day, but we talked the matter over with
him, showed him what a glorious hour it was for Kansas, etc.,
etc., and he soon concluded to get the suit put off and go to the
convention. Ex-Gov. Root, of Wyandotte, joined with him and us,
though he had not intended to go. We went to Topeka; and the day
and evening before the convention, pulled every wire and set
every honest trap. Gov. Robinson has a long head, and he arranged
the "platform" so shrewdly, carefully using the term "impartial,"
which he said meant right, and we must make them use it, so that
there would be no occasion for any other State Association. In
this previous meeting, the most prominent men of the State were
made officers of the permanent organization. When the platform
was read, with the names of the officers, and the morning's
discussion was over, everybody then felt that the ball was set
right. But in the P.M. came a Methodist minister and a lawyer
from Lawrence as delegates, "instructed" to use the word
"impartial," "as it had been used for the last two years," to
make but one issue, and to drop the woman. The lawyer said, "If I
was a negro, I would not want the woman hitched on to my skirts,"
etc. He made a mean speech. Mrs. Nichols and I came down upon
him, and the whole convention, except the Methodist, was against
him. The vote was taken whether to drop the woman, and only the
little lawyer from Lawrence, with a hole in his coat and only one
shoe on, voted against the woman. After that it was all one way.
The papers all came out right, I mean the Topeka papers. One
editor called on us, said we need not mention that he had called,
but he wanted to assure us that he had always been right on this
question. That the mean articles in his paper had been written by
a subordinate in his office in his absence, etc. That the paper
was fully committed, etc., etc. That is a fair specimen of the
way all the others have done, till we got to this place. Here the
Republicans had decided to drop the woman, Anthony with the
others, and I think they are only waiting to see the result of
our meetings, to announce their decision. But the Democrats all
over the State are preparing to take us up. They are a small
minority, with nothing to lose, and utterly unscrupulous, while
all who will work with Sam Wood will work with anybody. I fully
expect we shall carry the State. But it will be necessary to have
a good force here in the fall, and you will have to come. Our
meetings are everywhere crowded to overflowing, and in every case
the papers speak well of them. We have meetings for every night
till the 4th of May. By that time we shall be well tired out. But
we shall see the country, and I hope have done some good. There
is no such love of principle here as I expected to find. Each
man goes for himself, and "the devil take the hindmost." The
women here are grand, and it will be a shame past all expression
if they don't get the right to vote. One woman in Wyandotte said
she carried petitions all through the town for female suffrage,
and not one woman in ten refused to sign. Another in Lawrence
said they sent up two large petitions from there. So they have
been at the Legislature, like the heroes they really are, and it
is not possible for the husbands of such women to back out,
though they have sad lack of principle and a terrible desire for
office.

Yours, L. S.


JUNCTION CITY, KANSAS, _April 20_.

DEAR MRS. STANTON:

We have had one letter from you, and have written you twice.
To-day I inclose an article by Col. Wood, which is so capital
that it ought to be printed. I wish you would take it to Tilton
(not Oliver), and if he says he will publish it, let him have it;
but if he hesitates, send it at once to the _Chicago Republic_,
and ask them to mark the article in some of their exchanges.
Perhaps the _Northern Methodist_, _The Banner of Light_, and the
_Liberal Christian_ would insert it. I shall not be back to the
May meeting; indeed, it would be better if we could stay till
June 1st, and go all along the Northern tier of counties. I think
this State will be right at the fall election. The _Independent_
is taken in many families here, and they are getting right on the
question of impartial suffrage. But there will have to be a great
deal of work to carry the State. We have large, good meetings
everywhere. If the _Independent_ would take up this question, and
every week write for it, as it does for the negro, that paper
alone could save this State; and with this, all the others.

What a pity it does not see the path that would leave it with
more than Revolutionary honors! I am thankful beyond expression
for what it does, but I am pained for what it _might do_. With
its 75,000 subscribers, and five times that number of readers,
what can the poor little _Standard_ do for us, compared with
that? I shall try and write a letter to the convention. May
strike the true note! I hope not a man will be asked to speak at
the convention. If they volunteer very well, but I have been for
the last time on my knees to Phillips or Higginson, or any of
them. If they help now, they should ask us, and not we them. Is
Susan with you?

L. S.


JUNCTION CITY, KANSAS, _April 21, 1867_.

DEAR FRIENDS, E. C. STANTON AND SUSAN B. ANTHONY:

You will be glad to know that Lucy and I are going over the
length and breadth of this State speaking every day, and
sometimes twice, journeying from twenty-five to forty miles
daily, sometimes in a carriage and sometimes in an open wagon,
with or without springs. We climb hills and dash down ravines,
ford creeks, and ferry over rivers, rattle across limestone
ledges, struggle through muddy bottoms, fight the high winds on
the high rolling upland prairies, and address the most
astonishing (and astonished) audiences in the most extraordinary
places. To-night it may be a log school house, to-morrow a stone
church; next day a store with planks for seats, and in one place,
if it had not rained, we should have held forth in an unfinished
court house, with only four stone walls but no roof whatever.

The people are a queer mixture of roughness and intelligence,
recklessness, and conservatism. One swears at women who want to
wear the breeches; another wonders whether we ever heard of a
fellow named Paul; a third is not going to put women on an
equality with niggers. One woman told Lucy that no decent woman
would be running over the country talking nigger and woman. Her
brother told Lucy that "he had had a woman who was under the sod,
but that if she had ever said she wanted to vote he would have
pounded her to death!"

The fact is, however, that we have on our side all the shrewdest
politicians and all the best class of men and women in this
State. Our meetings are doing much towards organizing and
concentrating public sentiment in our favor, and the papers are
beginning to show front in our favor. We fought and won a pitched
battle at Topeka in the convention, and have possession of the
machine. By the time we get through with the proposed series of
meetings, it will be about the 20th of May, if Lucy's voice and
strength hold out. The scenery of this State is lovely. In summer
it must be very fine indeed, especially in this Western section
the valleys are beautiful, and the bluffs quite bold and
romantic.

I think we shall probably succeed in Kansas next fall if the
State is thoroughly canvassed, not else. We are fortunate in
having Col. Sam N. Wood as an organizer and worker. We owe
everything to Wood, and he is really a thoroughly noble, good
fellow, and a hero. He is a short, rather thick set, somewhat
awkward, and "slouchy" man, extremely careless in his dress,
blunt and abrupt in his manner, with a queer inexpressive face,
little blue eyes which can look dull or flash fire or twinkle
with the wickedest fun. He is so witty, sarcastic, and cutting,
that he is a terrible foe, and will put the laugh even on his
best friends. The son of a Quaker mother, he held the baby while
his wife acted as one of the officers, and his mother another, in
a Woman's Rights Convention seventeen years ago. Wood has helped
off more runaway slaves than any man in Kansas. He has always
been _true_ both to the negro and the woman. But the negroes
dislike and distrust him because he has never allowed the word
white to be struck out, unless the word male should be struck out
also.



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