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But the negroes
dislike and distrust him because he has never allowed the word
white to be struck out, unless the word male should be struck out
also. He takes exactly Mrs. Stanton's ground, that the colored
men and women shall enter the kingdom _together_, if at all. So,
while he advocates both, he fully realizes the wider scope and
far greater grandeur of the battle for _woman_. Lucy and I like
Wood very much. We have seen a good deal of him, first at Topeka,
again at Cottonwood Falls, his home, and on the journey thence to
Council Grove and to this place. Our arrangements for conveyances
failed, and Wood with characteristic energy and at great personal
inconvenience brought us through himself. It is worth a journey
to Kansas to know him for he is an original and a genius. If he
should die next month I should consider the election lost. But if
he live, and we all in the East drop other work and spend
September and October in Kansas, we shall succeed. I am glad to
say that our friend D. R. Anthony is out for both propositions in
the _Leavenworth Bulletin_. But his sympathies are so especially
with the negro question that we must have Susan out here to
strengthen his hands. We must have Mrs. Stanton, Susan, Mrs.
Gage, and Anna Dickinson, this fall. Also Ben Wade and Carl
Schurz, if possible. We must also try to get 10,000 each of Mrs.
Stanton's address, of Lucy Stone's address, and of Mrs. Mills
article on the Enfranchisement of Women, printed for us by the
Hovey Fund.

Kansas is to be _the battle ground_ for 1867. _It must not be
allowed to fail._

The politicians here, except Wood and Robinson, are generally "on
the fence." But they dare not oppose us openly. And the
Democratic leaders are quite disposed to take us up. If the
Republicans come out against us the Democrats will take us up. Do
not let anything prevent your being here September 1 _for the
campaign_, which will end in November. There will be a big fight
and a great excitement. After the fight is over Mrs. Stanton will
never have _use_ for _notes_ or _written_ speeches any more.

Yours truly, HENRY B. BLACKWELL.


FORT SCOTT, _May 1, 1867_.

DEAR SUSAN:

I have just this moment read your letter, and received the
tracts; the "testimonies" I mean. We took 250 pounds of tracts
with us, and we have sowed them thick; and Susan, the crop will
be impartial suffrage in the fall. It will carry, beyond a doubt,
in this State. Now, as I can not be in New York next week, I want
you to see Aunt Fanny and Anna Dickinson, and get them pledged to
come here in the fall. We will raise the pay somehow. You and
Mrs. Stanton will come, of course. I wish Mrs. Harper to come. I
don't know if she is in New York; please tell her I got her
letter, and will either see or correspond with her when I get
home. There is no time to write here. We ride all day, and
lecture every night, and sometimes at noon too. So there is time
for nothing else. I am sorry there is no one to help you, Susan,
in New York. I always thought that when this hour of our bitter
need come--this darkest hour before the dawn--Mr. Higginson would
bring his beautiful soul and his fine, clear intellect to draw
all women to his side; but if it is possible for him to be
satisfied at _such_ an hour with writing the best literary
essays, it is because the power to help us has gone from him. The
old lark moves her nest only when the farmer prepares to cut his
grass himself. This will be the way with us; as to the
_Standard_, I don't count upon it at all. Even if you get it, the
circulation is so limited that it amounts almost to nothing. I
have not seen a copy in all Kansas. But the _Tribune_ and
_Independent_ alone could, if they would urge _universal_
suffrage, as they do negro suffrage, carry this whole nation upon
the only just plane of equal human rights. What a power to hold,
and not use! I could not sleep the other night, just for thinking
of it; and if I had got up and written the thought that burned my
very soul, I do believe that Greeley and Tilton would have echoed
the cry of the old crusaders, "God wills it;" and rushing to our
half-sustained standard, would plant it high and firm on
immutable principles. _They_ MUST take it up. I shall see them
the very first thing when I go home. At your meeting next Monday
evening, I think you should insist that all of the Hovey fund
used for the _Standard_ and Anti-Slavery purposes, since slavery
is abolished, must be returned with interest to the three causes
which by the express terms of the will were to receive _all_ of
the fund when slavery was abolished. You will have a good
meeting, I am sure, and I hope you will not fail to rebuke the
cowardly use of the terms "universal," and "impartial," and
"equal," applied to hide a dark skin, and an unpopular client.
All this talk about the infamous thirteen who voted against
"negro suffrage" in New Jersey, is unutterably contemptible from
the lips or pen of those whose words, acts, and votes are not
against ignorant and degraded negroes, but against every man's
mother, wife, and daughter. We have crowded meetings everywhere.
I speak as well as ever, thank God! The audiences move to tears
or laughter, just as in the old time. Harry makes capital
speeches, and gets a louder cheer always than I do, though I
believe I move a deeper feeling. The papers all over the State
are discussing pro and con. The whole thing is working just
right. If Beecher is chosen delegate at large to your
Constitutional Convention, I think the word male will go out
before his vigorous cudgel. I do not want to stay here after the
4th, but Wood and Harry have arranged other meetings up to the
18th or 20th of May, so that we shan't be back even for the
Boston meetings.

Very truly, LUCY STONE.

In a letter dated Atchison, May 9, 1867, Lucy Stone says: I
should be so glad to be with you to-morrow, and to know this
minute whether Phillips has consented to take the high ground
which sound policy as well as justice and statesmanship require.
I can not send you a telegraphic dispatch as you wish, for just
now there is a plot to get the Republican party to drop the word
"male," and also to agree to canvass _only_ for the word "white."
There is a call, signed by the Chairman of the State Central
Republican Committee; to meet at Topeka on the 15th, to pledge
the party to the canvass on that single issue. As soon as we saw
the call and the change of tone of some of the papers, we sent
letters to all those whom we had found true to principle, urging
them to be at Topeka and vote for both words. This effort of ours
the Central Committee know nothing of, and we hope they will be
defeated, as they will be sure to be surprised. So, till this
action of the Republicans is settled, we can affirm nothing.
Everywhere we go we have the largest and most enthusiastic
meetings, and any one of our audiences would give a majority for
woman suffrage. But the negroes are all against us. There has
just now left us an ignorant black preacher named Twine, who is
very confident that women ought not to vote. These men _ought not
to be allowed to vote before we do_, because they will be just so
much more dead weight to lift.

Mr. Frothingham's course of lectures, happily, is over. Were you
ever so cruelly hurt by any course of lectures before? "If it had
been an enemy I could have borne it." But for this man, wise,
educated, and good, who thinks he is our friend, to do just the
things that our worst enemies will be glad of, is the unkindest
cut of all. Ninety-nine pulpits out of every hundred have taught
that women should not meddle in politics; as large a proportion
of papers have done the same; and by every hearthstone the lesson
is repeated to the little girl; and when she has learned it, and
grows up, and does not throw away the teaching of a life time,
Mr. Frothingham accepts this _effect_ for a _cause_, and blames
the unhappy victim, when he should stand by her side, and with
all his power of persuasion win her away from her false teaching,
to accept the truth and the nobler life that comes with it. But,
thank God, the popular pulse is setting in the right direction.

We must see Wade, and Garfield, and Julian, and when Sumner
proposes, as he says he shall, to make negro suffrage universal,
_they_ must _insist_ upon _our_ claim; urged not for our sake
merely, but that the government may be based upon the consent of
the governed. There is safety in no other way. We shall leave for
home on the 20th. We had the largest meeting we have yet had in
the State at Leavenworth night before last. Your brother and his
wife called upon us at Col. Coffin's. They are well. But Dan
don't want the Republicans to take us up. Love to Mrs. Stanton.

LUCY STONE.

P. S.--The papers here are coming down on us, and every prominent
reformer, and charging us with being Free Lovers. I have to-day
written a letter to the editor, saying that it has not the shadow
of a foundation.

Rev. Olympia Brown arrived in the State in July, where her untiring
labors, for four months were never equaled by man or woman. Mrs.
Stanton, Miss Anthony, and the Hutchinson family followed her early in
September. What these speakers could not do with reason and appeal,
the Hutchinsons, by stirring the hearts of the people with their sweet
ballads, readily accomplished.



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