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Their opposition is low and
scurrilous, as it used to be fifteen and twenty years ago at the
East. Hurry on the tracts.

As ever, S. B. A.


Seeing that the republican vote must be largely against the woman's
amendment, the question arose what can be done to capture enough
democratic votes to outweigh the recalcitrant republicans. At this
auspicious moment George Francis Train appeared in the State as an
advocate of woman suffrage. He appealed most effectively to the
chivalry of the intelligent Irishmen, and the prejudices of the
ignorant; conjuring them not to take the word "white" out of their
constitution unless they did the word "male" also; not to lift the
negroes above the heads of their own mothers, wives, sisters, and
daughters. The result was a respectable democratic vote in favor of
woman suffrage.

In a discussion with General Blunt at a meeting in Ottawa, Mr. Train
said:

You say, General, that women in politics would lower the
standard. Are politicians so pure, politics so exalted, the polls
so immaculate, men so moral, that woman would pollute the ballot
and contaminate the voters? Would revolvers, bowie-knives, whisky
barrels, profane oaths, brutal rowdyism, be the feature of
elections if women were present? Woman's presence purifies the
atmosphere. Enter any Western hotel and what do you see, General?
Sitting around the stove you will see dirty, unwashed-looking
men, with hats on, and feet on the chairs; huge cuds of tobacco
on the floor, spittle in pools all about; filth and dirt,
condensed tobacco smoke, and a stench of whisky from the bar and
the breath (applause, and "that's so,") on every side. This,
General, is the manhood picture. Now turn to the womanhood
picture; she, whom you think will debase and lower the morals of
the elections. Just opposite this sitting room of the King, or on
the next floor, is the sitting room of the Queen, covered chairs,
clean curtains, nice carpets, books on the table, canary birds at
the window, everything tidy, neat and beautiful, and according to
your programme the occupants of this room will so demoralize the
occupants of the other as to completely undermine all society.

Did man put woman in the parlor? Did woman put man in that bar
room? Are the instincts of woman so low that unless man puts up a
bar, she will immediately fall into man's obscene conversation
and disreputable habits? No, General, women are better than men,
purer, nobler, hence more exalted, and so far from falling to
man's estate, give her power and she will elevate man to her
level.

One other point, General, in reply to your argument. You say
woman's sphere is at home with her children, and paint her as the
sovereign of her own household. Let me paint the picture of the
mother at the washtub, just recovering from the birth of her last
child as the Empress. Six little children, half starved and
shivering with cold, are watching and hoping that the Emperor
will arrive with a loaf of bread, he having taken the wash money
to the baker's. They wait and starve and cry, the poor emaciated
Empress works and prays, when lo! the bugle sounds. It is the
Emperor staggering into the yard. The little famished princesses'
mouths all open are waiting for their expected food. Your friend,
General, the Emperor, however, was absent minded, and while away
at the polls voting for the license for his landlord, left the
wash money on deposit with the bar-keeper (laughter) who wouldn't
give it back again, and the little Queen birds must starve
another day, till the wash-tub earns them a mouthful of something
to eat. Give that woman a vote and she will keep the money she
earns to clothe and feed her children, instead of its being spent
in drunkenness and debauchery by her lord and master....

You say, General, that you intend to vote for _negro suffrage_
and against _woman suffrage_. In other words, not satisfied with
having your mother, your wife, your sisters, your daughters, the
equals _politically_ of the negro--by giving him a vote and
refusing it to woman, you wish to place your family politically
still lower in the scale of citizenship and humanity. This
particular twist, General, is working in the minds of the people,
and the democrats, having got you where Tommy had the wedge,
intend to hold you there. Again you say that Mrs. Cady Stanton
was three days in advance of you in the border towns, calling you
the Sir John Falstaff of the campaign. I am under the impression,
General, that these strong minded woman's rights women _are more
than three days in advance of you_. (Loud cheers.) Falstaff was a
jolly old brick, chivalrous and full of gallantry, and were he
stumping Kansas with his ragged regiment, he would do it as the
champion of woman instead of against her. (Loud cheers.) Hence
Mrs. Stanton owes an apology to Falstaff, not to General Blunt.
(Laughter and cheers.)

One more point, General. You have made a terrific personal attack
on Senator Wood, calling him everything that is vile. I do not
know Mr. Wood. Miss Anthony has made all my arrangements; but
perhaps you will allow me to ask you if Mr. Wood is a democrat?
(Laughter and applause from the democrats.) Gen. Blunt--No, he is
a republican, (laughter) and chairman of the woman suffrage
committee. Mr. Train--Good. I understand you and your argument
against Wood is so forcible, (and Mr. Train said this with the
most biting sarcasm, every point taking with the audience.) I
believe with you that Wood is a bad man, (laughter) a man of no
principle whatever. (Laughter.) A man who has committed all the
crimes in the calendar, (loud laughter) who, if he has done what
you have said, ought to be taken out on the square and hung, and
_well hung_ too. (Laughter and cheers.) Having admitted that I am
converted to the fact of Wood's villainy, (laughter) and you
having admitted that he is not a democrat, but a republican,
(laughter) I think it is time the honest democratic and
republican voters should rise up in their might and wipe off all
those corrupt republican leaders from the Kansas State committee.
(Loud cheers.) Democrats do your duty on the fifth of November
and vote for woman suffrage. (Applause.) The effect of turning
the General's own words back upon his party was perfectly
electric, and when the vote was put for woman's suffrage it was
almost unanimous. Mr. Train saying amid shouts of laughter, that
he supposed that a few henpecked men would say "No" here, because
they didn't dare to say their souls were their own at home....

Mr. TRAIN continued: Twelve o'clock at night is a late hour to
take up all your points, General; but the audience will have me
talk. Miss Anthony gave you, General, a very sarcastic retort to
your assertion that every woman ought to be married. (Laughter.)
She told you that to marry, it was essential to find some decent
man, and that could not be found among the Kansas politicians who
had so gallantly forsaken the woman's cause. (Loud laughter.) She
said, as society was organized there was not one man in a
thousand worthy of marriage--marrying a man and marrying a whisky
barrel were two distinct ideas. (Laughter and applause.) Miss
Anthony tells me that your friend Kalloch said at Lawrence that
_of all the infernal humbugs of this humbugging Woman's Rights
question, the most absurd was that woman should assume to be
entitled to the same wages for the same amount of labor
performed, as man_. Do you mean to say that the school mistress,
who so ably does her duty, should only receive three hundred
dollars, while the school master, who performs the same duty,
gets fifteen hundred? (Shame.) All the avenues of employment are
blocked against women. Embroidering, tapestry, knitting-needle,
sewing needle have all been displaced by machinery; and women
speakers, women doctors, and women clerks, are ridiculed and
insulted till every modest woman fairly cowers before her Emperor
Husband, her King, her Lord, for fear of being called "strong
minded." (Laughter and applause.) Why should not the landlady of
that hotel over the way share the profits of their joint labors
with the landlord? _She_ works as hard--yet _he_ keeps all the
money, and she goes to him, instead of being an independent
woman, for her share of the profits, as a _beggar_ asking for ten
dollars to buy a bonnet or a dress. (Applause from the ladies.)
Nothing is more contemptible than this slavery to the husband on
the question of money. (Loud applause.) Give the sex votes and
men will have more respect for women than to treat them as
children or as dolls. (Applause.) The ten-year old boy will say
to his women relatives, "Oh you don't know anything, you are only
a woman," and when man wishes to insult his fellow man, he calls
him a woman--and if the insult is intended to be more severe, he
will speak of a cabinet statesman even as an "old woman." The
General and Mr. Kalloch are afraid that women will be corrupted
by going to the polls, yet they as lawyers have no hesitation in
bringing a young and beautiful girl into court where a curiosity
seeking audience are staring at her; where the judge makes her
unveil her face, and the jury watch every feature, turning an
honest blush into guilt. (Applause.)

Woman first, and negro last, is my programme; yet I am willing
that intelligence should be the test, although some men have more
brains in their hands than others in their heads.



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