A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
We think so, because we now so seldom
find women plowing, or teaming, or mowing (with machines), though
there is no other obstacle to their so doing than their own sense
of fitness, and though some women, under peculiar circumstances,
laudably do all these things. We decidedly object to having ten
women in every hundred compel the other ninety to vote, or allow
the ten to carry elections against the judgment of the ninety;
but, if the great body of the women of Kansas wish to vote, we
counsel the men to accord them the opportunity. Should the
experiment work as we apprehend, they will soon be glad to give
it up.

Whereupon, the Atchison _Daily Champion_, John A. Martin, editor,
retorted:

TAKE IT YOURSELVES.--Thirty-one gentlemen, all but six of whom
live in States that have utterly refused to have anything to do
with the issue of "female suffrage," unite in an address, to
apply, as they say, the "principles of the Declaration of
Independence to women;" and make a specious, flimsy, and
ridiculous little argument in favor of their appeal.

It is a pity that comments in the main so sensible, should be
marred by a few statements as ridiculous as is the trashy address
to which the article refers. It is the old cry that "female
suffrage," a novel proposition, although justly regarded with
distrust and suspicion by all right-thinking people; although not
demanded by even a considerable minority of the women themselves;
and although an "experiment" which may rudely disturb the best
elements of our society and civilization, may be tried in Kansas!
"We regard it with distrust," says the _Tribune_, "but are quite
willing to see it tried in Kansas." "Upon a full and fair trial,"
it continues, "we believe they (the women) would conclude that
the right of suffrage for women was, on the whole, rather a
plague than a profit, and vote to resign it into the hands of
their husbands and fathers." But it "decidedly objects to having
ten women in every hundred compel the other ninety to vote, or to
allow the ten to carry elections against the judgment of ninety."
These expressions of grave doubt as to the expediency of "female
suffrage," together with the fact that the editor of the
_Tribune_, in his report as chairman of the Suffrage Committee in
the New York Constitutional Convention, declared this new hobby
"an innovation revolutionary and sweeping, openly at war with a
distribution of duties and functions between the sexes as
venerable and pervading as government itself," make the
_Tribune's_ recommendation that we shall "try the experiment in
Kansas" rather amusing as well as impudent.

There is not a man nor a woman endowed with ordinary common sense
who does not know that Kansas is the last State that should be
asked to try this dangerous and doubtful experiment. Our society
is just forming, our institutions are crude. Ever since the
organization of the Territory, we have lived a life of wild
excitement, plunging from one trouble into another so fast that
we have never had a breathing-spell, and we need, more than any
other people on the globe, immunity from disturbing experiments
on novel questions of doubtful expediency. We can not afford to
risk our future prosperity and happiness in making an innovation
so questionable. We want peace, and must have it. Let
Massachusetts or New York, or some older State, therefore, try
this nauseating dose. If it does not kill them, or if it proves
healthful and beneficial, we guarantee that Kansas will not be
long in swallowing it. But the stomach of our State, if we may be
permitted to use the expression, is, as yet, too tender and
febrific to allow such a fearful deglutition.

* * * * *

REMINISCENCES BY HELEN EKIN STARRETT.

After the first Constitutional Convention in which Mrs. C. I. H.
Nichols did such valuable service for the cause of woman, the
question of woman suffrage in some shape or other was introduced
into every succeeding Legislature. In January, 1867, the
Legislature met at Topeka. Immediately upon the organization of
the Senate on the 9th, Hon. B. F. Simpson of Miami Co.,
introduced an amendment to strike the word "white" from the
suffrage clause of the State Constitution. Hon. S. N. Wood,
Senator from Chase Co., within five minutes introduced a
resolution to strike the word "male" from the same clause. This
resolution was made the special order for Thursday the 10th, when
it passed the Senate by a vote of nineteen to five. Of the five
noes, four were Republicans, the other a Democrat. Thus Mr. Wood,
although he started second, got ahead in the passing of his
resolution. The resolution of Hon. B. F. Simpson was referred to
the committee of the whole. When it came up Hon. S. N. Wood moved
to amend by also striking out the word "male," and in this shape
it passed.

The House amended by striking out the amendment of Mr. Wood. The
Senate, however, insisted on its re-instatement; the Democrats
and a majority of the Republicans standing by Mr. Wood. The fight
continued for over a month. The question came up in all stages
and shapes from the House; but Mr. Wood was always ready for them
with his woman suffrage amendment, and the Senate stood by him.
The friends of negro suffrage tried hard to get him to yield and
let their resolution through, but he was firm in his refusal,
saying he advocated both, "but if we can have but one, let the
negro wait." On the 12th day of February Hon. W. W. Updegraff, a
member of the House and an ardent supporter of both woman and
negro suffrage, went to Mr. Wood and urged a compromise. After a
long discussion two separate resolutions were prepared by Mr.
Wood, one for woman suffrage, the other for negro suffrage, and
these Mr. Updegraff introduced into the House the same day. The
next day the vote on the woman suffrage resolution came up and
stood fifty-two to twenty-five. Not being a two-thirds vote, the
resolution was lost.

On the 14th the negro suffrage resolution came up and passed by a
vote of sixty-one to fourteen. The vote on woman suffrage was
then re-considered, and after an assurance from Mr. Updegraff
that negro suffrage could be secured in no other way, it passed
by a vote of sixty-two to nineteen, getting one more vote than
negro suffrage. These resolutions were promptly reported to the
Senate, and on motion of S. N. Wood, the woman suffrage
resolution was passed by over a two-thirds vote. The negro
suffrage resolution was amended, and after a bitter fight was
passed. Thus these separate resolutions were both submitted to a
vote of the people. The Legislature adjourned about the 12th of
March. Hon. S. N. Wood immediately prepared a notice of a meeting
to be held in Topeka on the 2d of April to organize a canvass for
impartial suffrage without regard to sex or color. This was
published in the _State Record_ with the statement that it was by
the request of Hon. S. N. Wood; it was copied by all the papers
of the State. Mr. Wood, ex-Governor Robinson, and others, wrote
to many prominent advocates East asking them to be present at the
Topeka meeting. It was soon known that Lucy Stone and Henry B.
Blackwell would be there, and a very great and general interest
was aroused on the question.

April 2d at length arrived, and although it was a season of
terrible mud and rain, and there were no railroads, a very large
audience assembled. Hon. S. N. Wood rode eighty miles on
horseback to attend the meeting. Lucy Stone and Mr. Blackwell
were present. A permanent organization was effected, with
Governor S. J. Crawford as President; Lieutenant-Governor Green,
Vice-President; Rev. Lewis Bodwell and Miss Mary Paty, Recording
Secretaries; and S. N. Wood, Corresponding Secretary. A letter
was at once prepared and addressed to all the prominent men in
the State, asking them to aid in the canvass. Letters in reply
poured in from the gentlemen addressed, giving assurance of
sympathy and declaring themselves in favor of the movement. A
thorough canvass of the State was at once inaugurated. Lucy Stone
was invited and lectured in Lawrence, Leavenworth, Topeka, and
Atchison, to crowded houses, giving the proceeds to the cause.

Hon. S. N. Wood gave his whole time to the canvass, speaking with
Lucy Stone and Mr. Blackwell in nearly all the towns in the
western and northern part of the State. Mrs. Stone and Mr.
Blackwell visited nearly every organized county. As we have said
before, there were no railroads, and it was at an immense expense
of bodily fatigue that they accomplished their journeys, often in
the rudest conveyances and exposed to the raw, blustering winds
of a Kansas spring. Their meetings, however, were "ovations." Men
and women everywhere were completely won by the gentle,
persuasive, earnest addresses of Lucy Stone, while their newly
aroused interest was informed and strengthened by the logical
arguments and irresistible facts of Mr. Blackwell.

The religious denominations in Kansas from the first gave their
countenance to the movement, and clergymen of all denominations
were found speaking in its favor. At Olathe, the Old School
Presbytery was in session at the time of Lucy Stone's meeting
there. It was an unheard-of occurrence that the body adjourned
its evening session to allow her to occupy the church. All the
members of the Presbytery who heard her were enthusiastic in her
praise.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | 97 | | 98 | | 99 | | 100 | | 101 | | 102 | | 103 | | 104 | | 105 | | 106 | | 107 | | 108 | | 109 | | 110 | | 111 | | 112 | | 113 | | 114 | | 115 | | 116 | | 117 | | 118 | | 119 | | 120 | | 121 | | 122 | | 123 | | 124 | | 125 | | 126 | | 127 | | 128 | | 129 | | 130 | | 131 | | 132 | | 133 | | 134 | | 135 | | 136 | | 137 | | 138 | | 139 | | 140 | | 141 | | 142 | | 143 | | 144 | | 145 | | 146 | | 147 | | 148 | | 149 | | 150 | | 151 | | 152 | | 153 | | 154 | | 155 | | 156 | | 157 | | 158 | | 159 | | 160 | | 161 | | 162 | | 163 | | 164 | | 165 | | 166 | | 167 | | 168 | | 169 | | 170 | | 171 | | 172 | | 173 | | 174 | | 175 | | 176 | | 177 | | 178 | | 179 | | 180 | | 181 | | 182 | | 183 | | 184 | | 185 | | 186 | | 187 | | 188 | | 189 | | 190 | | 191 | | 192 | | 193 | | 194 | | 195 | | 196 | | 197 | | 198 | | 199 | | 200 | | 201 | | 202 | | 203 | | 204 | | 205 | | 206 | | 207 | | 208 | | 209 | | 210 | | 211 | | 212 | | 213 | | 214 | | 215 | | 216 | | 217 | | 218 | | 219 | | 220 | | 221 | | 222 | | 223 | | 224 | | 225 | | 226 | | 227 | | 228 | | 229 | | 230 | | 231 | | 232 | | 233 | | 234 | | 235 | | 236 | | 237 | | 238 | | 239 | | 240 | | 241 | | 242 | | 243 | | 244 | | 245 | | 246 | | 247 | | 248 | | 249 | | 250 | | 251 | | 252 | | 253 | | 254 | | 255 | | 256 | | 257 | | 258 | | 259 | | 260 | | 261 | | 262 | | 263 | | 264 | | 265 | | 266 | | 267 | | 268 | | 269 | | 270 | | 271 | | 272 | | 273 | | 274 | | 275 | | 276 | | 277 | | 278 | | 279 | | 280 | | 281 | | 282 | | 283 | | 284 | | 285 | | 286 | | 287 | | 288 | | 289 | | 290 | | 291 | | 292 | | 293 | | 294 | | 295 | | 296 | | 297 | | 298 | | 299 | | 300 | | 301 | | 302 | | 303 | | 304 | | 305 | | 306 | | 307 | | 308 | | 309 | | 310 | | 311 | | 312 | | 313 | | 314 | | 315 | | 316 | | 317 | | 318 | | 319 | | 320 | | 321 | | 322 | | 323 | | 324 | | 325 | | 326 | | 327 | | 328 | | 329 | | 330 | | 331 | | 332 | | 333 | | 334 | | 335 | | 336 | | 337 | | 338 | | 339 | | 340 | | 341 | | 342 | | 343 | | 344 | | 345 | | 346 | | 347 | | 348 | | 349 | | 350 | | 351 | | 352 | | 353 | | 354 | | 355 | | 356 | | 357 | | 358 | | 359 | | 360 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.