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All the
members of the Presbytery who heard her were enthusiastic in her
praise. We remember a meeting in Topeka at which the Rev. Dr.
Ekin,[84] then pastor of the Old School Presbyterian church, very
effectively summed up in a public address all the arguments of
the opposition by relating the story of the Canadian Indian who,
when told of the greatness of England, and also that it was
governed by a queen, a woman, turned away with an incredulous
expression of contempt, exclaiming, "Ugh! Squaw!" The effect upon
the audience was tremendous. At the same time letters of cheer
and encouragement were pouring in from prominent workers all over
the country. John Stuart Mill, of England, wrote to Hon. S. N.
Wood full of hope and interest for the success of the movement:


BLACKHEATH PARK, KENT, ENGLAND, _June 2, 1867_.

DEAR SIR: Being one who takes as deep and as continuous an
interest in the political, moral, and social progress of the
United States as if he were himself an American citizen, I hope I
shall not be intrusive if I express to you as the executive organ
of the Impartial Suffrage Association, the deep joy I felt on
learning that both branches of the Legislature of Kansas had, by
large majorities, proposed for the approval of your citizens an
amendment to your constitution, abolishing the unjust political
privileges of sex at one and the same stroke with the kindred
privilege of color. We are accustomed to see Kansas foremost in
the struggle for the equal claims of all human beings to freedom
and citizenship. I shall never forget with what profound interest
I and others who felt with me watched every incident of the
preliminary civil war in which your noble State, then only a
Territory, preceded the great nation of which it is a part, in
shedding its blood to arrest the extension of slavery.

Kansas was the herald and protagonist of the memorable contest,
which at the cost of so many heroic lives, has admitted the
African race to the blessings of freedom and education, and she
is now taking the same advanced position in the peaceful but
equally important contest which, by relieving half the human race
from artificial disabilities belonging to the ideas of a past
age, will give a new impulse and improved character to the career
of social and moral progress now opening for mankind. If your
citizens, next November, give effect to the enlightened views of
your Legislature, history will remember that one of the youngest
States in the civilized world has been the first to adopt a
measure of liberation destined to extend all over the earth, and
to be looked back to (as is my fixed conviction) as one of the
most fertile in beneficial consequences of all the improvements
yet effected in human affairs. I am, sir, with the warmest wishes
for the prosperity of Kansas,

Yours very truly, J. STUART MILL.

To S. N. Wood, Topeka, Kansas, U. S. A.

Rev. Olympia Brown came to Kansas the 1st of July, and made an
effective and extensive canvass of the State, often holding three
meetings a day. Other speakers, both from home and abroad, were
vigorously engaged in the work, and the friends of the movement
believed, not without cause, that Kansas would be the first State
to grant suffrage to women. Had the election been held in May
while the tide of public opinion ran so high in their favor,
there is little doubt that both resolutions would have been
carried unanimously. To explain the causes that led to the defeat
of both propositions, I quote from a letter of Hon. S. N. Wood,
in reply to questions addressed him as to certain facts of the
campaign. He writes: "About May 2d, C. V. Eskridge of Emporia
wrote a very scurrilous article against woman suffrage. It filled
three columns of _The News_. In it he denounced the lady
speakers in the most abusive manner, ridiculing them with
insulting epithets. About the middle of May F. H. Drenning,
Chairman of the Republican State Committee, called a meeting of
that committee to make arrangements to canvass the State for
negro suffrage. The committee met and published an address in
favor of manhood suffrage, and said nothing as to woman suffrage.
Shortly afterwards the same committee summoned C. V. Eskridge, T.
C. Sears, P. B. Plumb, I. D. Snoddy, B. F. Simpson, J. B. Scott,
H. N. Bent, Jas. G. Blunt, A. Akin, and G. W. Crawford--all
opposed to woman suffrage--to make a canvass for negro suffrage.
They were instructed that "they would be allowed to express their
own sentiments on other questions." This meant that these men
would favor negro suffrage, but would oppose woman suffrage. This
at once antagonized the two questions, and we all felt that the
death blow had been struck at both."

Early in September, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony
came to the State to assist in the canvass; and certainly if
indefatigable labor and eloquent addresses could have repaired
the mischief done by the State Republican Committee, the cause
would yet have triumphed. At all places where they spoke they had
crowded houses, and everywhere made the warmest friends by their
truly admirable personal qualities.[85] The amount of work
performed by these two ladies was immense. Mrs. Stanton, escorted
by Ex-Gov. Robinson spoke in nearly every county of the State.
Miss Anthony remained at Lawrence working indefatigably in
planning and advertising meetings, distributing tracts, sending
posters to different places, and attending to all the minutiŠ and
drudgery of an extensive campaign. Often have I regarded with
admiration the self-sacrificing spirit with which she arranged
matters for others, did the hard and disagreeable work, and then
saw others carry off the honor and glory, without once seeming to
think of her services or the recognition due them.[86]

In a letter, summing up the campaign, Hon. S. N. Wood said, "On
the 25th of September, an address was published signed by over
forty men, the most prominent in the State; such men as Senator
Pomeroy, Senator Ross, Gov. Crawford, Lt. Gov. Green, Ex-Gov.
Robinson, and others, in favor of woman suffrage, but the cause
of both began to lag. Sears, Eskridge, Kalloch, Plumb, Simpson,
Scott, Bent, and others, made a very bitter campaign against
woman suffrage. About the middle of October George Francis Train
commenced a canvass of the State for woman suffrage and the
questions became more and more antagonized. The last few days a
regular Kilkenny fight was carried on." I will here take occasion
to record that several of the gentlemen who then canvassed the
State against woman suffrage have since announced a
reconsideration of their views; some of them have even stated
that were the question to come up again they would publicly
advocate it.

An address was prepared by the Woman's Impartial Suffrage
Association of Lawrence[87] which was widely circulated and
copied even in England. This address was signed by a large number
of the prominent ladies of Lawrence. Miss Anthony often said that
Lawrence was the headquarters of the movement. Every clergyman,
every judge, both the papers and a large proportion of the
prominent citizens were in favor of it. And with our State
University located here with over three hundred students, one
half of whom are ladies, we still claim Lawrence as the
headquarters of the friends of woman suffrage.

The work of George Francis Train has been much and variously
commented upon. Certainly when he was in Kansas he was at the
height of his prosperity and popularity, and in appearance,
manners and conversation, was a perfect, though somewhat unique
specimen of a courtly, elegant gentleman. He was full of
enthusiasm and confident he would be the next President. He drew
immense and enthusiastic audiences everywhere, and was a special
favorite with the laboring classes on account of the reforms he
promised to bring about when he should be President. Well do I
remember one poor woman, a frantic advocate of woman suffrage,
who button-holed everybody who spoke a word against Train to beg
them to desist; assuring them "that he was the special instrument
of Providence to gain for us the Irish vote."

Both propositions got about 10,000 votes, and both were defeated.
After the canvass the excitement died away and the Suffrage
Associations fell through, but the seed sown has silently taken
root and sprung up everywhere. Or rather, the truths then spoken,
and the arguments presented, sinking into the minds and hearts of
the men and women who heard them, have been like leaven, slowly
but surely operating until it seems to many that nearly the whole
public sentiment of Kansas is therewith leavened. A most liberal
sentiment prevails everywhere toward women. Many are engaged in
lucrative occupations. In several counties ladies have been
elected superintendents of public schools. In Coffey County, the
election of Mary P. Wright, was contested on the ground that by
the Constitution a woman was ineligible to the office. The case
was decided by the Supreme Court in her favor. By our laws women
vote on all school questions and avail themselves very
extensively of the privilege. Our property laws are conceded to
be the most just to women of any State in the Union. It is
believed by many that were the question of woman suffrage again
submitted to the people it would be carried by an overwhelming
majority.

The following letter from Susan E.



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