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Gov. J. P. St. John is
now making himself heard in his temperance speeches in favor of
woman suffrage. The recent passage of the Prohibitory Amendment
is significant that our people are awake and ready to welcome the
greatest good to the greatest number, which means equal rights to
all at an early day.

R. S. TENNEY.


MARCH 14, 1882.

DEAR FRIENDS:--God bless the women that worked for woman's
suffrage in Kansas! Foremost among those who were residents of
the State was Mrs. C. I. H. Nichols, of Wyandotte, and to her,
more than all other Kansas women, was due the influence which
gave woman even the small recognition in the constitution under
which the State was admitted, above what is found in other State
constitutions of the nation; for this Mrs. Nichols labored with
the zeal and heroism born of a great noble heart, whose every
pulsation is for humanity in the elevation of woman to her proper
political as well as social position. It was largely through her
instrumentality that such God-ordained women as Elizabeth Cady
Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and Olympia Brown, came to
Kansas as eloquent missionaries in the great work of attempting
to give the women of this State the legal right to vote with
their husbands, sons and brothers. And though, through the
opposition of unwise and prejudiced men, the desired majority for
woman's suffrage was not then obtained; the seed sown by these
self-sacrificing angels of humanity will yet bring forth most
glorious results. The efforts of the Hutchinson troupe of sweet
singers in this direction will not be forgotten. John, the
patriarch, with his bright son Henry and beautiful daughter
Viola, made a musical trio whose soul-stirring songs were only
excelled in purity of thought and delightful harmony of
execution, by their intense, whole-hearted desire that the cause
for which they prayed and sang with so much earnestness might be
crowned with success. Mr. Henry B. Blackwell, Lucy Stone's
husband, was indefatigable in his efforts, working early and late
for the good cause. Of the women of the State of Kansas who were
active, a large number of names might be given.[88] But Kansas
best remembers and most honors in the remembrance, those women
who left their comfortable and elegant homes on the Atlantic
slope, and with no hope of reward save the consciousness of
having worked for God and humanity, traveled over the then wild
prairies of Kansas in all sorts of rude vehicles, talking in
groves, school-houses, and cabins, eating and sleeping as
pioneers sleep and eat, for weeks and months, making the
beautiful rolling prairies, filled with fertile valleys and
flowery knolls, vocal with their eloquent, earnest appeals in
behalf of woman's rights and against woman's wrongs; and through
the vote carried for woman's wrongs the fervid, eloquent words
then uttered by woman's tongue, welling up as they did from noble
hearts heated to redness in the furnace of love for human
justice, left an influence which has steadily and surely
increased, and will thus continue until Kansas shall give woman
equal rights and privileges with man.

Sincerely yours, J. P. ROOT.


RACINE, WISCONSIN, _March 16, 1882_.

DEAR SUSAN:--You ask me to write an account of my experiences in
Kansas; with unquestioning obedience I attempt what you require,
although many records and documents are wanting which should have
been kept, had I anticipated your command. But when in Kansas, I
no more thought of appearing in history, than the butterfly
flitting from flower to flower thinks of being dried and put in a
museum.

I have never kept a diary, have never counted the number of miles
I have traveled, the meals eaten, calls made, pages written, or
words spoken. I have tried to do the pressing duty of each hour,
leaving the results and records to take care of themselves. You
will not, therefore, be surprised that I am unable to furnish
even the "round unvarnished tale," but must be content with
glimpses as memory, after the lapse of fourteen years, supplies
them.

I am glad to have an opportunity, through your valuable history,
of paying my respects to the good people whom I met in Kansas,
few of whom I shall ever see again in this life, but whose
earnest words go with me every day, a constant source of
encouragement and of strength. It would be but justice to record
the names of all those who gave generous aid and sympathy in the
woman suffrage campaign of '67; brave pioneers they were, who had
learned loyalty to principle through many bitter experiences;
some of them had been friends and companions of brave old John
Brown, and, trained in the great Anti-Slavery struggle, filled
with the love of liberty, they knew how to stand for the right.
But their names are recorded on high in letters of living light,
and they little need our poor faltering testimony. "Their reward
is with them, and their reward is sure." To-day, looking back
over the years, Kansas is to me a memory of grand, rolling
prairies stretching far away; of fertile fields; of beautiful
osage orange hedges; of hospitable homes; of brave and earnest
women; kind and true men; and of some of the most dishonest
politicians the world has ever seen.

I went to Kansas, through an arrangement made by Lucy Stone with
leaders of the Republican party there, whereby they were to
furnish comfortable conveyance over the State, with a lady as
traveling companion, and also to arrange and preside over all the
meetings; these were to be Republican meetings in which it was
thought best that a woman should present the claims of the woman
suffrage amendment, which had been submitted to the vote of the
men of the State by a strongly Republican Legislature.

The Kansas Republicans so far complied with their part of this
arrangement that on my arrival, the 1st of July, I found
appointments made and thoroughly advertised for the whole of July
and August; two lectures for every week day, and a preaching
service for every Sunday. As it proved, these appointments were
at great distances from each other, often requiring a journey of
twenty, thirty, forty, and even fifty miles across a country
scarcely settled at all, to reach some little village where there
would be a school-house or some public building in which a
meeting could be held. All were eager to hear, and the entire
settlement would attend the lecture, thus giving an astonishingly
large audience in proportion to the size of the place.

The country was then new and public conveyances few, and the
Republicans having failed to furnish the stipulated carriage and
escort, the speaker was dependent almost entirely upon the people
in each little place for the means to pursue the journey. Many a
time some kind man, with a genuine chivalry worthy of the days of
knighthood, has left his half-mown field or his sorghum boiling
in the kettle, to escort the woman suffrage advocate to the next
appointment; and although the road often seemed long and perilous
and many an hour was spent in what appeared a hopeless endeavor
to find our way over the almost trackless prairie, yet somehow we
always came to the right place at last; and I scarcely recollect
an instance of failure to meet an appointment from July 1st to
Nov. 5th.

In those four months I traveled over the greater part of Kansas,
held two meetings every day, and the latter part of the time
three meetings every day, making in all between two and three
hundred speeches, averaging an hour in length; a fact that tends
to show that women can endure talk and travel at least, as well
as men; especially when we recollect how the Hon. Sidney Clark,
then candidate for Congress, canvassed, in the beautiful autumn
weather, a small portion of the State which I had traveled over
amid the burning heat of July and August; he spoke once a day
instead of twice; he rested on Sundays; he had no anxiety about
the means of travel, his conveyance being furnished at hand; he
was supported by a large constituency, and expected to be
rewarded by office and honors; yet with all these advantages, he
broke down in health and was obliged to give up a part of his
appointments, and the Republican papers said: "It was not
strange, as no human being could endure without loss of health
such constant speaking, with such long and tedious journeys as
Mr. Clark had undertaken."

It is deemed, in certain quarters, wicked heresy to complain of
or criticise the Republican party, that has done so much in
freeing the slaves and in bringing the country victoriously
through the war of the rebellion; but if there is to be any truth
in history we must set it down, to stand forever a lasting
disgrace to the party that in 1867, in Kansas, its leaders
selfishly and meanly defeated the woman suffrage amendment.

As the time for the election drew nigh, those political leaders
who had been relied upon as friends of the cause were silent,
others were active in their opposition. The Central Committee
issued a circular for the purpose of preventing loyal Republicans
from voting for woman suffrage; not content with this, the
notorious I. S. Kalloch, and others of the same stripe, were sent
out under the auspices of the Republican party to blackguard and
abuse the advocates of woman's cause while professedly speaking
upon "manhood suffrage." And Charles Langston, the negro orator,
added his mite of bitter words to make the path a little harder
for women, who had spent years in pleading the cause of the
colored man.

And yet, with all the obstacles which the dominant party could
throw in our way; without organization, without money, without
political rewards to offer, without any of the means by which
elections are usually carried, we gained one-third of all the
votes cast!



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