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We chose the latter, and were defeated. But standing alone we
learned our power; we repudiated man's counsels forevermore; and
solemnly vowed that there should never be another season of silence
until woman had the same rights everywhere on this green earth, as
man.

While we hold in loving reverence the names of such men as Charles
Sumner, Horace Greeley, William Lloyd Garrison, Gerrit Smith, Wendell
Phillips and Frederick Douglass, and would urge the rising generation
of young men to emulate their virtues, we would warn the young women
of the coming generation against man's advice as to their best
interests, their highest development. We would point for them the
moral of our experiences: that woman must lead the way to her own
enfranchisement, and work out her own salvation with a hopeful courage
and determination that knows no fear nor trembling. She must not put
her trust in man in this transition period, since, while regarded as
his subject, his inferior, his slave, their interests must be
antagonistic.

But when at last woman stands on an even platform with man, his
acknowledged equal everywhere, with the same freedom to express
herself in the religion and government of the country, then, and not
till then, can she safely take counsel with him in regard to her most
sacred rights, privileges, and immunities; for not till then will he
be able to legislate as wisely and generously for her as for himself.


FOOTNOTES:

[76] DISAGREEMENTS IN THE REPUBLICAN STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE--THE
SUFFRAGE QUESTION.--The Kansas _State Journal_ publishes a letter from
Judge SAMUEL N. WOOD, in which he declares himself unqualifiedly in
favor of impartial suffrage. He says:

"I have not opposed, and shall not oppose negro suffrage. It should be
adopted because they are a part of the governed, and must have a voice
in the Government, just as much as women should. What I have had to do
with is the inconsistency and hypocrisy of those who advocate negro
suffrage and oppose Woman suffrage; the inconsistency and hypocrisy of
those negroes who claim rights for themselves that they are not
willing other human beings with equal intelligence should also enjoy."

The same paper says that at the meeting of the Republican State
Central Committee in Leavenworth, last week, the following resolution
was offered and laid on the table, by a vote of two yeas to one nay:

_Resolved_, That the Republican State Central Committee do not
indorse, but distinctly repudiate, as speakers, in behalf and under
the auspices of the Republican party, such persons as have defamed, or
do hereafter defame, in their public addresses, the women of Kansas,
or those ladies who have been urging upon the people of Kansas the
propriety of enfranchising the women of the State.

Mr. TAYLOR, who offered the resolution, has accordingly published the
following protest:

The undersigned, a member of the Republican State Central Committee of
Kansas, protests against the action of the Committee this day had, so
far as relates to the placing of the names of I. S. KALLOCH, C. V.
ESKRIDGE, and P. B. PLUMB, on the list of speakers to canvass the
State in behalf of Republican principles, for the reason that they
have within the last few weeks, in public addresses published
articles, used ungentlemanly, indecent, and infamously defamatory
language, when alluding to a large and respectable portion of the
women of Kansas, and to women now engaged in canvassing the State in
favor of impartial suffrage.

R. B. TAYLOR.

[77] DEMOCRATIC RESOLUTION.--_Resolved_, That we are opposed to all
the proposed amendments to our State Constitution, and to all unjust,
intolerant, and proscriptive legislation, whereby a portion of our
fellow citizens are deprived of their social rights and religious
privileges.

[78] ACTION OF THE GERMANS.--ST. LOUIS, _Sept. 26._--A special
dispatch to the _Republican_ from Wyandotte, Kansas, says: "The German
Convention, which was held at Topeka on Monday last, adopted
resolutions against Sunday and temperance laws, and declared that they
would not support any man for State, Legislative, or municipal office
who would not give his written pledge to oppose such laws. An
unsuccessful effort was made to commit the Germans to negro suffrage.
The female suffrage question was not touched."

[79] STATE TEMPERANCE CONVENTION.--LAWRENCE, KANSAS, _Sept. 26._--A
mass State Temperance Convention was held here last night, and was
addressed by Senator Pomeroy, ex-Gov. Robinson, Elizabeth Cady
Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony. Resolutions were passed committing the
Temperance people to female suffrage, and to prevent the repeal of the
Temperance law of last winter, to the abrogation of which the Germans
pledged themselves in their Convention on the 23d.

[80] The New York _Tribune_, May 29, 1867: "Womanhood suffrage is now
a progressive cause beyond fear of cavil. It has won a fair field
where once it was looked upon as an airy nothing, and it has gained
champions and converts without number. The young State of Kansas is
fitly the vanguard of this cause, and the signs of the agitation
therein hardly allow a doubt that the citizenship of women will be ere
long recognized in the law of the State. Fourteen out of twenty
newspapers of Kansas are in favor of making woman a voter. Governor
Crawford, ex-Governors Robinson and Root, Judge Schuyler, Col.
Ritchie, and Lieut.-Gov. Green, are the leaders of the wide-spread
Impartial League, which has among its orators Mistresses Stanton,
Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. The vitality of the Kansas movement is
indisputable, and whether defeated or successful in the present
contest, it will still hold strongly fortified ground." ...

[81] Mrs. Sarah B. Shaw, after having contributed $150 for Kansas,
wrote the following:

NORTH SHORE, September 22, 1867.

DEAR MISS ANTHONY:--If I were a rich woman I would inclose a
check of $1,000 instanter. Mr. Gay read your letter and said he
wished he had $500 to give. So you see if the right people only
had the money how the work would be done. Mr. Shaw says: "Tell
Miss Anthony if the women in Kansas vote on the schools and the
dram shops, I think the work is done there." I have not in my
mind one person who could give money who would, so I can not help
you.... I am very sorry to send you only this dry morsel, a stone
when you want bread, but I can only give you my earnest wishes,
though I will not fail to do my best. I have already sent your
letter to a rich friend, who has _reformed_ all her life, but I
do not know at all how she stands on the woman question. Believe
me, dear Miss Anthony,

Sincerely yours, SARAH B. SHAW.


OFFICE OF THE AMERICAN EQUAL RIGHTS ASSOCIATION, }
No. 37 Park Row (Room 17). NEW YORK, _Aug. 23, 1867_. }

DEAR LYDIA:-- ... I am just in from Staten Island, where Mrs. Gay
had $10 from Frank Shaw waiting for me. I went on purpose to go
to Mrs. Shaw, and persevered; the glorious result is $150 more.
Such a splendid woman; worthy the noble boy she gave in the war,
and worthy her noble son-in-law, George William Curtis. Lydia, we
shall go on to triumph in Kansas! The St. Louis _Democrat_
publishes Mr. Curtis' speech in full, with a splendid editorial.
The St. Louis _Journal_ gives the speech and the _Democrat's_
editorial "as a matter of news." I have 60,000 tracts now going
to press; all the old editions were gone, and we have to begin
new with an empty treasury; but I tell them all, "go ahead;" we
must, and will, succeed.

Affectionately yours, SUSAN B. ANTHONY.


TEMPLETON, MASS., _Sept. 21, 1867_, }
On way to Green Mountains. }

DEAR MISS ANTHONY:--Mrs. Severance desires me to inclose to you
this check, $50, and say that it is a contribution by friends at
and about Boston, to aid you in the good work of reconstruction
on the subject of woman's right to the ballot in Kansas.

Yours truly, T. C. SEVERANCE.


AUBURN, _Sept. 17, 1867_.

DEAR MR. PILLSBURY:--You may be very sure I would have answered
Susan's letter sooner if I had been able to inclose any such sum
as she hoped to obtain. All that I can do is to inclose a draft
for $30--ten from our daughter Eliza, ten from William and Ellen,
and ten from myself.... We can only feel grateful for the
self-sacrificing labors of those who have gone to Kansas, and
hopeful that better success may attend the efforts there, than
here or in Michigan.... I was very glad that Mrs. Stanton could
go.... We shall miss Mrs. Frances D. Gage. I always considered
her word as effective as any on our Woman's Rights platform. Her
rest has come.... Our children were in Syracuse on Sunday; they
heard a beautiful valedictory from Samuel J. May, recounting the
varied incidents of his life, lamenting his short-comings, and
advising them to choose a younger man for the duties he was no
longer able to perform alone. He is so well beloved by his
congregation that the probability is they will get an associate
for him.

Your friend, MARTHA C. WRIGHT.

[82] E. D. Draper, Hopedale, Massachusetts.

[83] James W. Nye, Nevada; Charles Robinson, S. N. Wood, Samuel C.
Pomeroy, E. G. Ross, Sidney Clark, S. G. Crawford, Kansas; Wm.
Loughridge, Iowa; Robert Collyer, Illinois; Geo. W. Julian, H. D.
Washburn, Indiana; R. E. Trowbridge, John F. Driggs, Michigan;
Benjamin F. Wade, Ohio; J. W. Broomall, William D. Kelley,
Pennsylvania; Henry Ward Beecher, Gerrit Smith, George William Curtis,
New York; Dudley S. Gregory, George Polk, John G. Foster, James L.
Hayes, Z.



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