A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
* * * * *

+-----------------------------------------------------------+
| Transcriber's Note: |
| |
| Inconsistent hyphenation and spelling in the original |
| document have been preserved. |
| |
| Subscripts are respresented with _{} e.g.: Q_{2}. |
| |
| Obvious typographical errors have been corrected. For |
| a complete list, please see the end of this document. |
| |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+

* * * * *




SEA POWER IN ITS RELATIONS
TO THE WAR OF
1812


BY

CAPTAIN A.T. MAHAN, D.C.L., LL.D.

_United States Navy_


AUTHOR OF "THE INFLUENCE OF SEA POWER UPON HISTORY, 1660-1783," "THE
INFLUENCE OF SEA POWER UPON THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
AND EMPIRE," "THE INTEREST OF AMERICA
IN SEA POWER," ETC.


IN TWO VOLUMES

VOL. II


LONDON
SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON & COMPANY
LIMITED

[Illustration: _From a Copley Print copyright 1899 by Curtis &
Cameron, Publishers, Boston._
_The Constitution_]




CONTENTS


CHAPTER IX

THE WINTER OF 1812-1813--BAINBRIDGE'S SQUADRON: ACTIONS BETWEEN
"CONSTITUTION" AND "JAVA," "HORNET" AND "PEACOCK"--INCREASING
PRESSURE ON ATLANTIC COAST
Page

Bainbridge's squadron sails 1

His plans for the cruise 2

The "Essex" fails to join 3

Proceedings of "Constitution" and "Hornet" 3

Action between "Constitution" and "Java" 4

The "Constitution" returns to the United States 7

Proceedings of the "Hornet" 7

Action between the "Hornet" and "Peacock" 8

The "Hornet" returns 9

The Chesapeake and Delaware blockaded 9

Subsequent extension of blockade to the whole coast south of
Newport 10

Three periods into which the War of 1812 divides 10

Difficulty of American frigates in getting to sea 11

Difficulty of manning the navy 12

Cruise of the "Chesapeake" 13

Gradual suppression of American commerce 14

Increasing stringency of the commercial blockade 15

British occupation of Delaware and Chesapeake Bays 16

Diminution of the coasting trade, and increase of land carriage 17

Effects upon prices 18

Abandoned condition of the western Atlantic 20

Diminution in number of prizes taken by Americans 20

Estimate of relative captures by the two belligerents 21

Relative captures no indication of relative immunity 23

American deprivation makes for the prosperity of Halifax and
Canada 23

The blockade the chief offensive maritime operation of Great
Britain, in 1813 24

No opposition longer possible to the American Navy 25

Strength of the British blockading divisions 25

Escape possible only by evasion 25

The brunt of the British naval operations falls upon the
Chesapeake and Delaware 26


CHAPTER X

CAMPAIGN OF 1813 ON THE LAKE FRONTIER, TO THE BATTLE OF LAKE ERIE


The British naval service on the lakes under Warren's
supervision 28

Sir James Yeo appointed to the local command 29

Appoints Captain Barclay to take charge of British vessels on
Lake Erie 29

The Americans now superior on Ontario 29

Montreal the true American objective 29

Dearborn ordered to concentrate effort upon Lake Ontario 30

Chauncey's first plan, to capture Kingston 30

Dearborn and Chauncey ordered to proceed first against Kingston,
then Toronto, then Niagara 31

Dearborn's objections 32

His reports obtain change of plan from the Government 33

Chauncey's new plan 33

The expedition leaves Sackett's Harbor 36

Capture of Toronto 36

Chauncey's anxiety for Sackett's Harbor 37

Capture of Fort George, and British retreat from Niagara 38

Effects of the American occupation of the Niagara peninsula 40

American naval vessels escape from Black Rock to Erie 41

British attack upon Sackett's Harbor 42

Premature firing of the naval yard and vessels 45

Consequent delay in Chauncey's preparations 45

Yeo takes the lake with his squadron 46

American reverse at Stony Creek 46

The army retreats upon Fort George 47

The British re-occupy the peninsula, except Fort George 47

Dearborn is relieved from command 48

Paralysis of the American forces at Niagara 48

Yeo in temporary control of Lake Ontario 49

Chauncey sails to contest control 51

Characteristics of the ensuing naval campaign 52

Predominant idea of Chauncey and Yeo 52

Relative powers of the two squadrons 53

Their encounter of August 10, 1813 56

Chauncey's extreme caution 59

The engagement of September 11 60

Expediency of a "general chase" under the conditions 61


CHAPTER XI

THE CAMPAIGN OF 1813 ON THE LAKES AND NORTHERN FRONTIER--THE BATTLE
OF LAKE ERIE

The American Navy on Lake Erie 62

Perry's eagerness for active operations 63

Coincidence of events on Lakes Erie and Ontario 64

Inferiority of Perry's crews in numbers and quality 64

Professional contrast between Chauncey and Perry 65

Personal difficulty. Perry applies to be detached 66

The Navy Department refuses 67

Position of the American army on the Maumee 67

Procter's attack upon Fort Meigs 68

Procter and Barclay plan attack on Erie 69

Re-enforcements of troops refused them 69

Barclay blockades Erie 70

Barclay visits Long Point 71

Perry's squadron crosses the bar at Erie 72

Procter attacks Fort Stephenson, and is repulsed 73

Barclay retires to Malden 74

Perry in control of the lake 74

Destitution of provisions in the British camp and fleet 75

Barclay goes out to fight 76

Composition and armament of the two squadrons 76

Controversy about the battle 78

Dispositions of the two commanders 80

Opening of the battle 81

Examination of the controversy between Perry and Elliott 82

Progress of the engagement 88

Second stage of the battle 89

The British surrender 94

Meritorious conduct of Captain Barclay 94

Question of credit on the American side 95

Comparison of the campaigns on Erie and on Ontario 99

Effect of the battle on the fate of the Northwest 99

Its bearing upon the peace negotiations of the following year 100

Influence of control of the water illustrated on the lakes 101


CHAPTER XII

THE CAMPAIGN OF 1813 ON THE LAKES AND NORTHERN FRONTIER, AFTER
THE BATTLE OF LAKE ERIE

Perry's victory promptly followed up 102

General Harrison lands his army at Malden 103

Recovery of Detroit. Battle of the Thames, October 5, 1813 103

The Indians fall away from the British 103

Harrison's army transferred to Niagara 104

Perry detached from the lake service 104

Changed American plan of campaign on Ontario 104

General James Wilkinson replaces Dearborn 104

The Government designates Kingston as the objective 105

The embarkation begins at Niagara under cover of the navy 106

Yeo's squadron appears in the neighborhood 106

Encounter between the two squadrons, September 28, 1813 107

Criticism of Chauncey's management 108

Wilkinson's troops reach Sackett's Harbor 110

The British re-enforce Kingston 110

New change of American plan.



Pages: | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.