A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
Failure 282

Wilkinson superseded by General Izard 283

Yeo obtains momentary superiority on Ontario 283

Importance of Oswego 284

British capture Oswego, and destroy depots 284

Yeo blockades Sackett's Harbor 285

Difficulty of American situation on Ontario 285

British naval disaster in attempting to intercept convoy
from Oswego to Sackett's Harbor 286

Yeo abandons blockade of Sackett's Harbor 290

American plan of operations on northern frontier 291

Brown crosses the Niagara. Surrender of Fort Erie 294

Advance towards Fort George 294

Battle of Chippewa 295

Brown advances to Queenston 298

Chauncey's failure to co-operate 298

Consequent anxiety of the Government 299

Decatur ordered to relieve Chauncey 300

Chauncey's defence of his conduct 300

Discussion of his argument 301

British advantage through his inaction 304

Leads to the battle of Lundy's Lane 306

Battle of Lundy's Lane 309

Value to Americans of the battles of Chippewa and Lundy's Lane 311

Improvement in the militia through association with Brown's army 312

Brown unable longer to keep the field. Retires to Fort Erie 314

British assault upon Fort Erie. Disastrous repulse 314

British now embarrassed by Chauncey's blockade 315

American successful sortie from Fort Erie 316

Drummond abandons the siege, and retires to the Chippewa 317

Brown unable to follow him 317

Izard ordered from Lake Champlain to Brown's aid 318

His march 320

His corps arrives at the Niagara frontier 321

Strength of the British position on the Chippewa 322

Izard's hopelessness 322

Blows up Fort Erie and retires across the Niagara 323

Naval and military expedition against Mackinac 324

Unsuccessful, except in destroying British transports 324

British capture the American naval schooners "Tigress" and
"Scorpion" 325

American schooners "Ohio" and "Somers" also captured, off
Fort Erie 327

Loss of the "Caledonia" and "Ariel" 327

The Erie fleet lays up for the winter, after the British
abandon the siege of Fort Erie 328


CHAPTER XVI

SEABOARD OPERATIONS IN 1814. WASHINGTON, BALTIMORE, AND MAINE


Defensive character of the British northern campaign in 1814 329

Increase of vigor in their seaboard operations 330

Warren relieved by Cochrane 330

Intentions of the British Government 331

Retaliation for American actions in Canada 333

Prevost's call upon Cochrane to retaliate 334

Cochrane's orders to his vessels 334

Attitude of British officers 335

Early operations in Chesapeake Bay, 1814 336

Relations of Barney's flotilla to the British project against
Washington 337

Assembling of the British combined forces in the Chesapeake 340

Condition of American preparations 342

British advance. Destruction of Barney's flotilla 344

Retreat of American forces 345

American position at Bladensburg 346

Battle of Bladensburg 347

Burning of Washington 349

Capture and ransom of Alexandria by British frigates 350

Failure of British attempt on Baltimore 351

British harrying of New England coast 352

Occupation of Castine, in Maine 353

Destruction of the American frigate "Adams" 354


CHAPTER XVII

LAKE CHAMPLAIN AND NEW ORLEANS


Arrival of large British re-enforcements in Canada 355

Objects of the British northern campaign of 1814 356

Previous neglect of lake Champlain by both belligerents 357

Operations on the lake in 1813 358

British attempt in spring of 1814 361

Macdonough in control of lake, in summer of 1814 362

British "Confiance" building to contest control 362

Instructions of British Government to Prevost 362

Prevost in August reports approaching readiness to move 363

Treasonable actions of American citizens about Lake Champlain 364

Izard, with four thousand troops, leaves Plattsburg for
Sackett's Harbor 365

Consequent destitution of the Champlain frontier 365

British advance to Plattsburg 366

Relative positions of American squadron and land forces 367

Question of distance between squadron and land batteries 368

Opinions of Izard and Yeo as to the relations of the batteries
to the squadron 370

Proper combination for Prevost 371

Backward state of "Confiance" upon Downie's taking command 372

Urgent letters of Prevost to Downie 373

Downie's expectations in attacking 375

Macdonough's dispositions 376

Downie's consequent plan of engagement 377

Naval battle of Lake Champlain 377

Decisive character of the American victory 381

Preoccupation of the British Government with European conditions 382

Episodical character of the New Orleans expedition 382

Negotiations of Admiral Cochrane for the co-operation of the
Creek Indians 383

His measures for training them, and preparations for the
expedition 384

Objects of the British ministry 385

Attack upon Fort Bowyer, Mobile Bay, by a British squadron 386

Previous occupation of West Florida to the Perdido, by the
United States 387

Pensacola, remaining in Spanish hands, utilized by British 387

Seized by Jackson, and works destroyed 388

Arrival of British expedition in Mississippi Sound 388

Gunboat battle of Lake Borgne 390

British advance corps reaches the bank of the Mississippi 391

Night attack by American Navy and Jackson 391

Sir Edward Pakenham arrives from England 392

His preliminary movements 392

Particular danger of Jackson's position 393

Details of the final day of assault, January 8, 1815 394

The British withdraw after repulse 396

Capture of Fort Bowyer, Mobile Bay 397

Final naval episodes 397

Sailing of the "President." She grounds on the New York bar 398

Overtaken, and is captured, by the British blockading division 398

The "Constitution" captures the "Cyane" and "Levant" 404

Capture of the British sloop "Penguin" by the "Hornet" 407


CHAPTER XVIII

THE PEACE NEGOTIATIONS

Early overtures towards peace by the United States 409

Castlereagh refuses to entertain the project of abandoning
impressment 410

Russia, in 1812, suggests negotiations for peace under mediation
of the Czar 411

United States accepts, but Great Britain refuses 412

Great Britain, through the Czar, offers a direct negotiation,
1813 412

The United States accepts, and names five commissioners 413

The original instructions to the American Commission, 1813 413

Reduced, 1814, through pressure of the war 414

Confident attitude of Great Britain at the opening of the
negotiations 415

Hostile spirit in Great Britain towards the United States 415

The instructions to the British Commission 416

The demand on behalf of the Indians 417

Faulty presentation of it by the British Commission 418

British claim concerning the Great Lakes and boundaries 419

Discussion of these propositions 419

Reasons for British advocacy of the Indians 421

Final reduction of British demand for the Indians and acceptance
by American Commission 423

Concern of British ministry for the opinion of Europe 424

News received of the capture of Washington 424

Sanguine anticipations based upon reports from Cochrane and Ross 424

The British Government suggests the _uti possidetis_ as the
basis of agreement 425

The American Commission refuse, and offer instead the _status
ante bellum_ 426

News arrives of the British defeat on Lake Champlain 426

The political instructions to the commanders of the New Orleans
expedition, to be communicated for the satisfaction of the
continental powers 427

Urgency of the European situation 428

Dangerous internal state of France 428

Consequent wish of the British ministry to withdraw Wellington
from Paris 429

He is pressed to accept the American command 429

Wellington thus brought into the discussion of terms 430

He pronounces against the basis of _uti possidetis_ 431

The British ministry accept his judgment 431

The _status ante bellum_ accepted by Great Britain 431

Subsequent rapid conclusion of agreement 432

Terms of the Treaty 432

Signed by the commissioners, December 24, 1814 434

Despatched to America by a British ship of war 435

Ratified by the United States, February 17, 1815 435

Gallatin's opinion of the effect of the war upon the people
of the United States 436


INDEX 439




LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

VOLUME TWO.


THE CHASE OF THE _Constitution_ _Frontispiece_
From the painting by S.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.