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1;
as Chancellor of Exchequer, 1783, introduces bill favorable to United
States, for regulating commerce, 58;
controversy over bill, 60;
measure then dropped, 67, 68;
concession becomes possible to, 87, 97;
return to power, in 1804, 100;
new measures of, due to popular discontents, 101-104;
remark to Gouverneur Morris, concerning impressment difficulties, 120;
death of, 104.

_Porter, David._ Captain, U.S.N.
Commands frigate "Essex," i. 407; ii. 1-3, 13;
cruise of "Essex," in Pacific, ii. 244-247;
action with, and capture by, "Phoebe" and "Cherub," 249-252;
approves of commerce destroying by naval armed schooners, appointed
to command a squadron of them, and draws up plan of operations, 270;
engaged in harassing retreat of British frigates in Potomac, 350.

_Porter, Peter B._ Representative in Congress from New York, and general
of New York militia.
Testimony at trial of General Hull, i. 340;
duel with General Smyth, 358;
tribute to gallantry of naval detachment at Niagara, 315;
engaged at Chippewa, ii. 295,
on Niagara peninsula, 306,
and Lundy's Lane, 310.

"_President._" American frigate.
Rencounter with British sloop of war "Little Belt," i. 256-259;
cruises under command of Commodore Rodgers, i. 322-324, 407-409;
ii. 128-129;
sails under Decatur, 397;
capture of, by British squadron, 398-401.

_Prevost, Sir George._ British general.
Governor of Nova Scotia, reports failure of American embargo, i. 199.
Governor-General of Canada, and commander-in-chief, reports British
naval superiority on lakes, 1812, i. 295;
statements of effect of naval control on operations, 302; ii. 40,
306, 316, 362-363, 374-375;
negotiates suspension of hostilities with Dearborn, i. 351-352;
instructs Brock to forbear offensive, 356, 367;
visit of, to Kingston, February, 1813, effect of, on American
plans, ii. 32;
attack on Sackett's Harbor by, in conjunction with Yeo, 42-45;
instructions to Procter, at Malden, 67,
and to De Rottenburg, at Niagara, 69;
submits plan for securing territories in United States to Indian
allies of Great Britain, 99 (note);
calls upon Admiral Cochrane to inflict retaliation for unauthorized
burning by Americans in Canada, 329, 334;
receives large re-enforcements from Wellington's Peninsular army,
362-363,
with instructions for operations, 362;
reasons for advancing by New York side of Lake Champlain, instead
of through Vermont, 363;
advance upon Plattsburg, 365-367;
awaits the arrival of British squadron before attacking, 372-375;
reason for desiring a joint attack by army and navy, 372 (note);
correspondence with Captain Downie, commanding the squadron, 373-375;
charges against, by naval officers of the squadron, 375, 381;
retreats after squadron's defeat, 381;
summoned home under charges, but dies before trial, 381.
Retreat of, after the naval defeat, endorsed by Wellington, 430.

_Pring, Daniel._ Commander, R.N.
Attached to lake service, Lake Champlain, 360;
operations on, 360-361, 366;
second in command at battle of Lake Champlain, 372-381.

_Privateering._
Employment of a sea-militia force, requiring little antecedent
training, i. 286;
recourse of the weaker belligerent, 288;
aptitude of Americans for, 384;
extemporized character of early, in War of 1812, 394;
opinions concerning nature of, of Secretaries Gallatin and Jones, 396;
susceptible of business regulation and direction, 397, 399; ii. 220,
225, 229;
energy of American, noted by Warren, i. 401-402;
effect of, upon regular navy, ii. 12;
a secondary operation of war, not in itself decisive, 126;
primary object of, 215-216, 241;
details of methods pursued, in 1812, 222, 225, 226, 240;
comparison of, with a regular naval service, in motive, and
inefficiency for the particular object of commerce destroying,
241-244;
a popular effort in War of 1812, independent of Government
initiative, 265;
development and systematization of, towards end of war, 267-268, 269.

_Privateers_ mentioned by name:
"America," i. 398; ii. 229;
"Chasseur," ii. 237-240;
"Comet," ii. 234;
"Decatur," ii. 233;
"Globe," ii. 226-228;
"Governor Tompkins," ii. 228;
"Kemp," ii. 236;
"Leo," ii. 224;
"Lion," ii. 224;
"Mammoth," ii. 269;
"Rapid," i. 398;
"Rattlesnake," ii. 223;
"Rossie," i. 295-297;
"Saucy Jack," ii. 235-236;
"Scourge," ii. 223;
"True-blooded Yankee," ii. 225;
"Yankee," ii. 226.
Number and classes of, ii. 243-244.
Combats, of. See _Actions, Privateer_.

_Prizes_ taken by Americans in first three months of war, and in what
localities taken, i. 394-395;
taken by British in same period, 399-400;
at later period of war, 406;
transition period of prize-taking, January-June, 1813, ii. 20;
estimate of relative losses by the two belligerents, 21-22;
compilation of lists, by Niles' Register, 22;
overlooked significance of the greater British losses, 23, 221;
limited success of American frigates in taking, to what attributable,
216;
taken by American cruisers, in latter part of war, 220-221;
in West Indies, 230;
total number taken throughout the war, by American naval vessels, and
by privateers, 241-243.

_Proclamation._
Commerce between Great Britain and America, regulated by, 1783-1794,
i. 67-70;
issued by Jefferson excluding British armed vessels from American
waters, after "Chesapeake" affair, 160-161;
Royal, directing commanders of British naval vessels to impress
British-born seamen found in foreign merchant ships, and denying
efficacy of naturalization papers to discharge from allegiance, 166;
by Jefferson, against combinations to defy Embargo laws, 207;
by Madison, permitting renewal of trade with Great Britain, 219,
and withdrawn, 219;
by Madison, announcing revocation of Napoleon's Decrees, 238.

_Procter, Henry._ British general.
As colonel, in command of Fort Malden, i. 345;
acts against Hull's communications, 345;
instructions from Brock, after fall of Detroit, 367;
compels surrender of Winchester's detachment at Frenchtown, 370;
subsequent action, 373; ii. 67, 68;
attack on Fort Meigs, 68;
project against Erie, 69;
baffled at Fort Stephenson, 73;
upon Harrison's approach, after battle of Lake Erie, evacuates
Detroit and Malden, retreating up valley of the Thames, and defeated
at Moravian Town, 103;
reaches British lines at Burlington, with remnant of his force, 103.


_Quincy, Josiah._ Representative in Congress from Massachusetts.
Defines position of New England concerning Orders in Council and
impressment questions, i. 211-212;
disproves the accuracy of the charge brought by the Administration
against the British minister, Jackson, 232;
supports the report for increase of navy, 260;
predicts that a suitable naval establishment would be a unifying force
in national politics, 261;
sends word to seaports of intended embargo of April, 1812, 263.


"_Rattlesnake._" American brig of war.
Particulars of cruise of, ii. 231-233.

_Reeves._
British writer on the Navigation Laws, quoted, i. 14, 15, 17, 19, 23,
25, 39 (note).

"_Reindeer._" British sloop of war.
Captured by "Wasp," ii. 254.

_Riall, Phineas._ British general, commanding on Niagara frontier,
December, 1813.
Captures Fort Niagara, and raids successfully western New York,
burning towns in retaliation for the burning of Newark, ii. 120-122;
in 1814, suggests destruction of Fort Niagara, 275;
at Chippewa and Lundy's Lane, with intervening operations, 295-298,
306-310;
wounded and captured at Lundy's Lane, 310.

_Rodgers, John._ Captain, U.S.N.
Encounter with British sloop "Little Belt," i. 256-259;
commands a squadron at declaration of war, 314;
opinion as to proper mode of using navy against enemy's commerce,
317-320; ii. 130-131, 216;
orders of Navy Department to, 320;
sails with squadron on the first cruise of the war, 322;
incidents, 323-324,
and effects, direct and indirect, of first cruise of, 324-327;
effects of second cruise, 402-404;
incidents of second cruise, with "President" and "Congress," 407-409;
incidents of third cruise, in "President" alone, ii. 128-129;
after fourth cruise, enters New York, and turns over command of
"President" to Decatur, i. 405.
Employed in Potomac River, harassing retreat of British squadron from
Alexandria, 350.

_Rose, George H._
British special envoy to Washington for settlement of "Chesapeake"
affair, i. 165-167;
failure of mission, 167.

_Ross, Robert._ British general employed in Chesapeake expedition.
Instructions issued to, ii. 331;
capture of Washington, 340-351;
killed in advance against Baltimore, 357;
instructions to, for New Orleans expedition, 385-386;
sanguine expectations of, after capture of Washington, 424-425;
succeeded by Sir Edward Pakenham for New Orleans expedition, 392, 427.

_Rottenburg, De._
British general in command on Niagara frontier June, 1813, ii. 69;
declines to detach to aid of Procter and Barclay on Lake Erie, 69;
proceeds to Kingston, with re-enforcements, in anticipation of
American attack, 110-111;
despatches detachment in pursuit of Wilkinson's movement down the St.
Lawrence, 114.

_Russell, Jonathan._
American _chargé d'affaires_ in France, after Armstrong's departure,
i. 247;
correspondence with American and French Governments relative to the
alleged repeal of the French Decrees, quoted, 247, 267, 268;
transferred as _chargé_ to London, 264;
correspondence as such with American and British Governments, quoted,
264, 266, 272-278;
opinion of the alleged French Decree of April 28, 1811, 272, 276;
negotiation with Castlereagh, after declaration of war, looking to
suspension of hostilities, ii. 409-411;
appointed additional peace commissioner at Ghent, 413.

_Russia._
Offers in 1812 mediation between Great Britain and United States,
ii.



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