A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
409-411;
appointed additional peace commissioner at Ghent, 413.

_Russia._
Offers in 1812 mediation between Great Britain and United States,
ii. 411;
accepted by United States, but rejected by Great Britain, 412;
attitude of Czar towards America, 423-124, 428.


_Sackett's Harbor._ American naval station on Lake Ontario.
Conditions at, i. 302, 309, 363, 374, 376; ii. 37, 38, 50, 104-106,
110-113, 119, 276, 278, 280, 281, 291, 304;
ships constructed at, 364, 366, 377; ii. 49, 276, 283, 291, 318 (note);
attack upon, by Prevost and Yeo, ii. 42-45;
Brown's march from, to Niagara frontier, 281;
Yeo's blockade of, 285,
abandoned, 290;
Izard's march to, on way to support Brown at Niagara, 319-320;
Chauncey retires finally to, after launch of the British "St.
Lawrence," 323;
destruction of, prescribed to Prevost by instructions, in 1814, 329, 362;
Yeo's observations at, 318 (note).

_Seaboard, United States._
Conditions on, i. 296-298, 300, 310-313, 360, 393, 404-406;
ii. 15-19, 24-27, 127-128, 148-150, 152-155, 202;
Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, 1813, ii. 155-178;
three divisions of the seaboard, Northern, Middle, and Southern, 178;
distinctive topographical features of each, 178, 179, 183, 184, 193, 195;
proportionate effect of the war upon each, with reasons therefor,
179-183;
commercial and military characteristics of Middle section, 183-184;
necessity of coasting trade to Middle, 184,
less than to Northern and Southern, 185-187;
effect of hostile pressure upon coasting in Northern section, 192-194;
in Southern section, 195-198, 203;
effectual separation between the sections by the British blockades,
198-201;
statistics of export, 201;
momentary importance of North Carolina coast, 203;
effects of pressure upon seaboard shown by rebound upon peace, in
prices, and in shipping statistics, 204-207;
statement by a naval officer of the time, 207-208;
operations in Chesapeake Bay, 1814, 336-341, 350-351;
capture of Washington, 341-350;
occurrences on New England coast, 352;
invasion of Maine, and occupation of Castine, 353-354;
Gulf coast and New Orleans, 382-397.

_Scott, Winfield._ American general.
Quoted, i. 336; ii. 48, 104 (note), 118, 240 (note), 297;
joins Wilkinson's expedition down the St. Lawrence, ii. 113;
on Niagara frontier, in 1814, 279, 281, 282;
battle of Chippewa, 294-298;
Lundy's Lane, 306-311;
severely wounded, 311,
and unable to serve again during the campaign, 314;
president of the Court of Inquiry concerning the capture of
Washington, 341-342.

"_Shannon._" British frigate, blockading off New York.
Pursuit of "Constitution," and protection of convoy, i. 325-329;
admirable efficiency of, under Captain Broke, 133-134;
capture of "Chesapeake" by, 135-145;
reported injuries to, 146-147.

_Sheffield, Lord._ British writer on economical questions.
Conspicuous opponent of Pitt's policy in opening West India trade to
American navigation, i. 50;
leading constructive ideas of, in scheme of policy towards the United
States, 63-64, 65-66;
success of, in preventing Pitt's measure, 67, 68;
Gibbon's estimate of, 73 (note);
apparent temporary success of policy of, 75-79;
Canada and the other North-American colonies fail to fulfil the part
expected from them, 86;
pamphlet of, "Observations on the Commerce of the American States," 65;
quotations from, i. 28 (note), 31 (note), 37 (and note), 46, 47, 49,
50, 57, 65, 72.

_Sherbrooke, Sir John._ British general, Governor of Nova Scotia.
Ordered to occupy so much of Maine as shall insure direct
communication between Halifax and Quebec, ii. 353;
expedition to the Penobscot, and seizure of Castine and Machias, 354;
Wellington's opinion of the result, 354, 431.

_Sinclair, Arthur._ Commander, U.S.N., commanding on Upper Lakes, in
1814, ii. 324;
operations of, 324-328;
mentioned, 333.

_Smith, Adam._
Quoted in connection with the Navigation Act, i. 9-10, 49.

_Smith, Robert._
American Secretary of State during early part of Madison's first term,
i. 222;
correspondence with, and in the case of, Jackson, the British minister
to Washington, 222-228;
attributes to Madison's intervention an offensive expression in letter
to Erskine, 228-229.

_Smith, Samuel._ Senator from Maryland.
Quoted in connection with Embargo legislation, i. 184.

_Stewart, Charles._ Captain, U.S.N.
Commands "Constellation," ii. 11,
when driven into Norfolk, and there blockaded for the rest of the
war, 12;
his reports while in Norfolk waters, 10, 17, 160-162;
transferred to the "Constitution," at Boston, 161, 162;
difficulty in escaping from Boston, 147 (see also i. 405 and ii. 12);
first cruise in "Constitution," 230-231;
second escape, 404;
captures "Cyane" and "Levant," 405-406;
quoted, ii. 12, 20.

_Strong, Caleb._ Governor of Massachusetts.
Quoted, in support of British claim to impress, i. 7;
in condemnation of the war, and of the invasion of Canada, ii. 352.

_St. Vincent, Earl of._ British admiral and First Lord of the Admiralty.
Statements and opinions concerning impressment, during Rufus King's
negotiations, i. 124-126.


_Turreau, General._ French Minister to the United States.
Opinion that Erskine's concessions showed the break-down of Great
Britain, i. 230.


_Vincent, John._
British general, commanding on Niagara line, at the time of Dearborn's
attack, ii. 38;
retreat to Burlington, 39;
attack by, at Stony Creek, 46;
on American retreat reoccupies peninsula, except Fort George, 47-48;
superseded by De Rottenburg, Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada, 69;
left again in command by De Rottenburg's departure to Kingston, 110;
retreats again to Burlington on the news of battle of the Thames,
103, 118;
ordered to retire further, to York, and reasons for not doing so, 118.


_Warren, Sir John._
British admiral, and commander-in-chief on North American station,
i. 387;
Halifax and West Indian stations consolidated under, 387;
charged with diplomatic overture to American Government, 390;
reply received by, 391;
first impressions on arrival, 392;
representations to, 401,
and correspondence with, Admiralty, 402-404;
proclamations of blockades, ii. 9, 10;
the lakes service under supervision of, 28;
expectations of British Government and people from, 151;
operations in the Chesapeake, 155-169;
quits Chesapeake for the season, 177;
urgency of the Admiralty upon, 209-211;
relieved by Cochrane, 330.
Remark quoted, 332.

_Warrington, Lewis._ Commander, U.S.N., commanding "Peacock."
Captures "Epervier," ii. 258-261;
subsequent cruise, 261-262;
later cruise, 406-408.

_Washington, City of._
Capture by the British, ii. 337-350.

_Washington, George._
Statements concerning conditions in the United States before the
adoption of the Constitution, i. 47;
as President of the United States, recommendations concerning the navy,
ii. 212-213.

"_Wasp._" American sloop of war.
Action with, and capture of, "Frolic," i. 411-415;
is captured with her prize by the "Poictiers," seventy-four, 415.

"_Wasp._" American sloop of war, built and named for the last, which
was captured only by overwhelming force.
Cruise of, ii. 253-258;
action with, and capture of, "Reindeer," 254;
action with, and sinking of, "Avon," 256;
disappears at sea, 257.

_Wellesley, Marquis of._ British Secretary for Foreign Affairs.
Succeeds Canning, i. 229;
treatment of the Jackson case, 230-231, 250-252;
action in view of Champagny's letter, 238, 241-247;
construction placed by him upon the American demands consequent on
that letter, 246;
dilatory actions of, 252;
suggests to Pinkney to reconsider his intended departure, in view of
the nomination of Foster, 252;
summary statement of the British policy in the Orders in Council,
253-254.

_Wellington, Duke of._
Represents to British Government conditions in France, 1814, ii. 428,
and imminence of trouble in Paris, 429;
anxiety of British Government, to remove him from Paris, 429;
pressed to accept the command in America, 429;
reluctance of, 430;
influence of, upon the negotiations at Ghent, 430-431;
approves Prevost's retreat in default of naval command of the lakes,
430-431;
opinion of Sherbrooke's occupation of Maine, 431 (see also 354).

_West Indies._
Relations of, to the mother country and to the colonies of the American
continent, i. 32-40, 53-55, 56-58, 65-67;
British expectation that in these relations the lost colonies might
be replaced by Canada, Nova Scotia, etc., 44-48, 50-51, 64;
sufferings of, after 1776 and 1783, 54, 62-63, 67;
Pitt's measure, 1783, for benefit of, 58-60;
measure fails, and Navigation Acts applied to intercourse between
United States and, 68-70;
effect upon, 75, 78, 79;
recommendations of Committee of Privy Council, 1791, 82-84;
increased importance of, after outbreak of French Revolution, 86-88;
result, in fettering American intercourse with, 89, 95;
concession to United States of trade to, obtained in Jay's treaty, 96;
continued by British executive order, although article not confirmed
by Senate, 97;
course of British policy relating to, until 1805, 97-100;
question of American trade from, "direct" or "indirect," raised in
1805, 100;
decision adverse to American interests, 101-103;
object of new departure of British Government, 103;
principle asserted identical with colonial practice, and with Orders
in Council of 1807, which led to War of 1812, 104.
As a field for operations against commerce, ii. 229-240.

_Wilkinson, James._ American general.
Replaces Dearborn in command of New York frontier, ii. 104;
Armstrong's instructions to, 105;
movements of, 106;
concentrates at Sackett's Harbor, 109-111;
expedition down St. Lawrence against Montreal, 112-115;
failure of, and winter quarters at French Mills, 116;
removes thence to Plattsburg, 278;
abortive attempt against La Colle, 282-283;
superseded by Izard, 283.

_Winder, William H._ American general.
Captured in the British attack at Stony Creek, ii.



Pages: | Prev | | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | 81 | | 82 | | 83 | | 84 | | 85 | | 86 | | 87 | | 88 | | 89 | | 90 | | 91 | | 92 | | 93 | | 94 | | 95 | | 96 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.