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THE

DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE

OF THE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

VOL. XI.




THE

DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE

OF THE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION;

BEING

THE LETTERS OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, SILAS DEANE, JOHN ADAMS, JOHN JAY,
ARTHUR LEE, WILLIAM LEE, RALPH IZARD, FRANCIS DANA, WILLIAM
CARMICHAEL, HENRY LAURENS, JOHN LAURENS, M. DE LAFAYETTE, M. DUMAS,
AND OTHERS, CONCERNING THE FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES
DURING THE WHOLE REVOLUTION;

TOGETHER WITH

THE LETTERS IN REPLY FROM THE SECRET COMMITTEE OF CONGRESS, AND THE
SECRETARY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

ALSO,

THE ENTIRE CORRESPONDENCE OF THE FRENCH MINISTERS, GERARD AND LUZERNE,
WITH CONGRESS.


Published under the Direction of the President of the United States,
from the original Manuscripts in the Department of State, conformably
to a Resolution of Congress, of March 27th, 1818.


EDITED

BY JARED SPARKS.


VOL. XI.


BOSTON:

NATHAN HALE AND GRAY & BOWEN;

G. & C. & H. CARVILL, NEW YORK; P. THOMPSON, WASHINGTON.


1830.




Steam Power Press--W. L. Lewis' Print.

No. 6, Congress Street, Boston.




CONTENTS

OF THE

ELEVENTH VOLUME.


LUZERNE'S CORRESPONDENCE,

CONTINUED.


Page.

To the President of Congress. Philadelphia, September 10th,
1781, 3

Communicating the commission of M. Holker, as Consul
General of France.

To the President of Congress. Philadelphia, September 18th,
1781, 4

Desires the appointment of a committee, to whom he may
communicate his despatches.

Communications of the French Minister to Congress. In
Congress, September 21st, 1781, 4

Proposed mediation of the Imperial Courts.--The French
Court requires the establishing of some preliminaries,
as to the admission of an American Minister to the
proposed Congress, and the character in which England
will treat the United States.--The British Court
requires the submission of its revolted subjects in
America.--Necessity of vigorous operations in
America.--Mr Dana's mission to St Petersburg.--The
accession of Maryland to the confederacy should be
followed by vigorous measures.--Mr Adams in
Holland.--Aids to America.--No further pecuniary
assistance can be furnished by the French Court.

To the President of Congress. Philadelphia, September 24th,
1781, 17

Transmitting the memorial of a Spanish subject.

Memorial of Don Francisco Rendon to the Minister of France, 17

Requesting the release of certain prisoners taken at
Pensacola by the Spanish forces, and afterwards captured
by an American vessel.

Congress to the Minister of France. Philadelphia, September
25th, 1781, 19

Relative to the preceding memorial.

From Congress to the King of France, 20

Returning thanks for aid.

The King of France to Congress, 21

Birth of the Dauphin.

Robert R. Livingston to M. de la Luzerne. Philadelphia,
October 24th, 1781, 21

Announces his appointment to the Department of Foreign
Affairs.

To Robert R. Livingston, Secretary of Foreign Affairs.
Philadelphia, October 25th, 1781, 22

Expressing his pleasure at Mr Livingston's appointment.

Robert R. Livingston to M. de la Luzerne. Office of Foreign
Affairs, November 2d, 1781, 23

Congress request permission to present to the Count de
Grasse two pieces of ordnance taken at York.

To George Washington. Philadelphia, November 4th, 1781, 24

Acknowledging the receipt of certain papers.

To the Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Philadelphia, November
4th, 1781, 25

Erection of a triumphal column at Yorktown.--The United
States are named before the King in the resolutions.

Robert R. Livingston to M. de la Luzerne. Office of Foreign
Affairs, November 6th, 1781, 26

The order in which the United States and France were
named, was accidental.

Robert R. Livingston to the President of Congress. Office of
Foreign Affairs, November 6th, 1781, 28

Proposes the giving France the precedence in any
subsequent acts, where the two countries are named.

Robert R. Livingston to M. de la Luzerne. Office of Foreign
Affairs, November 21st, 1781, 29

Complains of the proceedings of the Court of Admiralty
in the French islands.

Heads of a verbal Communication made to the Secretary of
Foreign Affairs by the Minister of France. In Congress,
November 23d, 1781, 30

Satisfaction of the King with the appointment of
Ministers for negotiating a peace.--Refusal to accede to
the mediation, unless the American Ministers were
acknowledged.--Necessity of exertion in America to
compel Britain to a peace.

The Answer of his Most Christian Majesty to the Articles
proposed by the two Mediating Courts, 33

The Answer of the Court of London to the Preliminary
Articles proposed by the Mediating Courts, 40

The verbal Answer of the King of Great Britain to the verbal
Observations made by the Count de Belgiojoso, Austrian
Ambassador in London, 43

Reply of the Mediators to the Belligerent Powers, 45

Answer of the Court of France to the Reply of the Mediators, 48

To Robert R. Livingston. Philadelphia, November 23d, 1781, 51

Congress to the King of France, 51

Congratulations on the successes of the French arms in
America.--Services of de Grasse, de Rochambeau, and de
Lafayette.

To Robert R. Livingston. Philadelphia, December 11th, 1781, 53

Enclosing papers.

To Count du Durat, Governor of Grenada. Philadelphia,
December 11th, 1781, 54

Relative to an English ship carried into Grenada by
American sailors.

Robert R. Livingston to M. de la Luzerne. Office of Foreign
Affairs, December 21st, 1781, 55

Relative to captures.

Robert R. Livingston to M. de la Luzerne. Office of Foreign
Affairs, January 19th, 1782, 55

Enclosing suspicious letters of Mr Deane.

To Robert R. Livingston. Philadelphia, January 20th, 1782, 56

Complains of the process in Massachusetts in regard to
effects libelled.

Robert R. Livingston to M. de la Luzerne. Office of Foreign
Affairs, January 24th, 1782, 57

Communicating certain resolutions.

To Robert R. Livingston. Philadelphia, January 25th, 1782, 57

Thanking him for the preceding.

To the President of Congress. Philadelphia, January 28th,
1782, 58

Propriety of instructing Mr Franklin, in relation to the
acts necessary to bind the United States in their
engagements with France on account of the loan raised in
Holland.

The Secretary of Foreign Affairs to the President of
Congress. Philadelphia, January 29th, 1782, 59

Communicating extracts from letters of Count de
Vergennes to the French Minister, expressing the desire
of France to procure the most advantageous terms for
America.--Indisposition of Great Britain to a
peace.--Neither Holland nor Russia are disposed to an
alliance with the United States.--France cannot furnish
additional supplies.

Count de Vergennes to Robert R. Livingston. Versailles,
January 31st, 1782, 62

On his appointment to the Department of Foreign Affairs.

To Robert R. Livingston. Philadelphia, February 1st, 1782, 62

Instructions to Dr Franklin. In Congress, February 5th,
1782, 63

Empowering him to enter into engagements on the part of
the United States to discharge the loan raised in
Holland.

Resolves of Congress respecting the Communications made by
the Minister of France. In Congress, February 8th, 1782, 64

Urging the necessity of further supplies from
France.--Empowering Dr Franklin to raise a loan of
twelve millions of livres.

To Robert R. Livingston. Philadelphia, February 18th, 1782, 66

Requesting the revision of a sentence of condemnation
against certain prizes.

The Marquis de Bouillé to M. de la Luzerne. Without date, 67

Relative to the recapture of neutral ships trading to
Dominica by American privateers.

Memorial of the Council of Dominica, 69

Same subject.

Robert R. Livingston to M. de la Luzerne. Office of Foreign
Affairs, February 20th, 1782, 71

Case of the capture of the neutral ships trading to
Dominica.

To the President of Congress.



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