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He was ruined financially, though a grateful nation would
never permit him to suffer want.

[Illustration: THE FUNERAL TRAIN OF GENERAL GRANT PASSING WEST POINT.]

It was at this sad period that a cancer developed at the root of his
tongue, and, though he received the best medical attention in the
country, the malignant excrescence soon made it evident that he was
beyond human help. He devoted himself heroically to writing his
memoirs, and, with the grim determination which was so marked a feature
of his character, he fought off the last great enemy until the valuable
work was finished.

General Grant's last days were spent with his family at Mount McGregor
in New York State, where he quietly breathed his last on the evening of
July 22, 1885. The body was embalmed and removed to the City Hall in New
York, where it was viewed by mourning thousands before its removal to
the last resting-place in Riverside Park. The final impressive scenes,
when the remains were deposited in the mausoleum on the banks of the
Hudson, took place in 1897.


DEATH OF VICE-PRESIDENT HENDRICKS.

Thomas A. Hendricks, Vice-President of the United States, died November
25, 1885, at his home in Indianapolis, from paralysis of the heart. He
was born in Ohio in 1819, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in
1843. He was elected to the Indiana Legislature in 1848, and three years
later became Democratic member of Congress from the central district of
Indiana. He was chosen a United States senator in 1868, and strongly
opposed the impeachment of President Johnson. He was prominently named
several times for the presidency of the United States. In Indianapolis,
where he had long made his home, he was universally respected by members
of all parties.


OTHER VICE-PRESIDENTS WHO DIED IN OFFICE.

Since Mr. Hendricks was not the first Vice-President to die in office,
it will be interesting to complete the list. George Clinton served one
term under Jefferson, and had nearly ended another under Madison, when
he died in 1812. His career had been extraordinary. He was a soldier in
the French and Indian War, was a sailor on a privateer, and became a
brigadier-general in the Revolution, but was unsuccessful in his defense
of the Highland forts in 1777. At one time he was a member of the
Provincial Congress and was the first governor of New York, serving for
eighteen years, from 1777 to 1795, and again 1801-04, when he became
Vice-President. His death occurred in Washington, and the eight
pall-bearers were Revolutionary soldiers.

It was a curious coincidence that the next Vice-President to die in
office was the immediate successor of Clinton, Elbridge Gerry, who died
November 23, 1814. He was a native of Massachusetts, a member of its
colonial House of Representatives and a delegate to the Continental
Congress. He signed the Declaration of Independence and aided in framing
the Constitution, though he refused to sign it, on the ground that it
conferred too much power on the national government. He held a number of
important public offices and was governor of Massachusetts in 1810 and
1811. In the latter year, the Republicans (modern Democrats) carried
out a redistricting scheme by which the Essex district took a form which
many fancied bore a resemblance to a salamander. It was from this
incident that the word "gerrymander," so often heard in politics in
these days, took its name.

It will be recalled that when Franklin Pierce became President, the
Vice-President, William R. King, was an invalid in Cuba, where he took
the oath of office before the American consul. He was in the last stages
of consumption and died shortly after his return to his home in Alabama.

Henry Wilson, Vice-President with General Grant, died November 25, 1875,
his death being hastened, it is believed, by the news of the death of
his intimate friend, Senator Ferry, of Connecticut.

The death of General McClellan has already been mentioned as taking
place on the 29th of October, 1885. A few months later, February 9,
1886, General Hancock died at his home on Governor's Island.


DEATH OF GENERAL HANCOCK--HIS CAREER.

General Winfield Scott Hancock was an ideal American soldier and
officer, brave, chivalrous, courteous to foe as well as friend,
patriotic, a gentleman at all times and under all circumstances, genial,
remarkably handsome and prepossessing in manner, who made friends
everywhere. His conduct of political affairs in a section of the South
during the troublous reconstruction days won the commendation of his
government and the respect of the South, who pronounced him a "just
man," for whom they formed a strong personal affection. But for
Hancock's unfortunate slip, he assuredly would have been elected
President of the United States in 1880.

The two peculiarities of Hancock's birth was that he was a twin and was
born on St. Valentine's day, February 14, 1824, in Montgomery County,
Pennsylvania. Appointed to West Point, he found among his fellow-cadets
U.S. Grant, G.B. McClellan, Rosecrans, Longstreet, and Stonewall
Jackson.

Hancock entered the Mexican War as second lieutenant, taking part in
three engagements, receiving a wound and winning the brevet of first
lieutenant. He was appointed quartermaster in 1855, with the rank of
captain. Three years later he was a member of the expedition to Utah to
bring the Mormons to terms. When the Civil War broke out, he was at Los
Angeles, Southern California, where considerable sympathy was shown for
the Southern Confederacy. The tact of the United States forces in that
section held the State true, a patriotic speech of General Hancock
contributing greatly to the same end.

His patriotism would not allow him to remain idle, and, when he learned
of the grave condition of affairs in the East, he applied to be called
thither. The request was granted, and he was so anxious to serve his
country that he did not pause to call on his parents while on the way to
Washington.

Hancock's first appointment was as quartermaster-general in General
Robert Anderson's command in Kentucky; but McClellan, who knew his
worth, made a personal request of President Lincoln to appoint him
brigadier-general. His commission was dated September 23, 1861.
McClellan said of him: "He was a man of the most chivalrous courage and
of superb presence, especially in action; he had a wonderfully quick and
correct eye for ground and for handling troops; his judgment was good,
and it would be difficult to find a better corps commander."

[Illustration: CITY HALL, PHILADELPHIA.

Equestrian statues of Generals Reynolds and McClellan ornament the
plaza, and one of General Hancock is to be erected on one of the vacant
corners.]

General Hancock gave invaluable help in moulding the Army of the Potomac
into the magnificent form it attained, and his brigade was conceded to
be the finest and most effective in the whole army at the time the
landing was made on the peninsula between Chesapeake Bay and the James
River.

In the bloody battle of Williamsburg, his skill and personal courage
were of the highest order. Making a feint of retreating, he drew the
enemy after him into the position he intended, when he turned and
assailed them with a furious musketry fire. It was his men who captured
the first colors taken by the Army of the Potomac, and it was on that
occasion that Hancock used the expression which has been often quoted.
In the midst of the tumult and swirl of battle he shouted: "Now,
gentlemen, we will give them the bayonet!" Hancock received the personal
thanks of McClellan for his fine work.

He was always loyal to his superiors, McClellan, Burnside, McClellan
again, Hooker, and Meade, rapidly rising in prominence until at the
great battle of Gettysburg he contributed perhaps more than any single
man to the success of the Union arms. Among the titles applied to him by
his admiring countrymen were "The Superb" and "The Hero of Gettysburg."

The Confederates who came in contact with him expressed their admiration
of his dauntless courage and coolness. He was painfully wounded, but,
while lying on a stretcher, he sent a message to General Meade that the
Confederate army was in retreat. Meade replied with his grateful thanks
and sympathy, and Congress also thanked him.

His ardent patriotism placed him in the saddle before his wound had
healed, and at one time during the battle of the Wilderness he was
obliged to give up his command. At Chancellorsville he captured the
whole division of General Edward Johnson. When that officer was brought
into Hancock's tent the latter extended his hand to his old
acquaintance, exclaiming heartily, "How are you, Ned?"

"I refuse to take your hand," replied the humiliated prisoner.

"All right," said Hancock, "I shouldn't have offered it to you under any
other circumstances."

Hancock was in command of the Second Army Corps for the last time at the
battle of Boydton. His remarkable skill in training soldiers caused
Secretary Stanton to assign to him the task of organizing the First
Veteran Corps, composed of soldiers, all of whom had been in service two
years. He afterward commanded the Army of the Shenandoah, and was in
charge at Washington at the time of the assassination of Lincoln.

In 1869, he was transferred from the command of the division of the
Atlantic and assigned to that of Dakota, where he remained until 1872,
when he resumed command of the division of the Atlantic. His last public
appearance was when he commanded the military forces which assisted in
the funeral ceremonies of General Grant.

As a proof that General Hancock's skill with the pen was hardly less
than that with the sword, the following extract is given from an article
by him on the battle of Gettysburg:

[Illustration: ARBITRATION

The relations of capital and labor--mutually dependent the one upon the
other--both selfish and often unjust--have caused serious trouble in the
past decade of the world's history. Fair and equitable arbitration seems
to be the only safe and just way of settling disputes of this
character.]

"Cemetery Hill has since become consecrated ground.



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