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Transcriber's Note:
Source: http://www.archive.org/details/marvelloushistor00chamrich






_THE_
MARVELLOUS HISTORY
_OF_
THE SHADOWLESS
MAN.

_by_ A. von CHAMISSO

_and_

THE COLD HEART

_by_ WILHELM HAUFF

_With an Introduction by_
DR. A. S. RAPPOPORT

_Illustrated by_
FORSTER ROBSON


LONDON
HOLDEN & HARDINGHAM




CONTENTS

THE SHADOWLESS MAN

PAGE
INTRODUCTION
AUTHOR'S INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 1
" 2
" 3
" 4
" 5

THE COLD HEART

INTRODUCTION
PART 1
" 2




LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


THE SHADOWLESS MAN

"THE WHOLE SWARM PROCEEDED IMMEDIATELY TO RECONNOITRE
ME AND TO PELT ME WITH MUD" _Frontispiece_
_To face page_

"AN EXTRAORDINARY LOOKING OLD MAN LEFT ME THESE
PAPERS SAYING HE CAME FROM BERLIN" 2

FANNY 6

"I DREW THE ILL-FATED PURSE FROM MY BOSOM; AND IN A
SORT OF FRENZY THAT RAGED LIKE A SELF-FED FIRE
WITHIN ME, I TOOK OUT GOLD--GOLD--GOLD" 16

"AND TREMBLING LIKE A CRIMINAL STOLE OUT OF THE HOUSE" 18

"I SUFFERED HER TO FALL FROM MY ARM IN A FAINTING FIT" 28

"SHE ADVANCED FROM THE MIDST OF HER COMPANIONS, AND
BLUSHINGLY KNELT BEFORE ME PRESENTING A WREATH" 30

"NEXT EVENING I WENT AGAIN TO THE FORESTER'S GARDEN" 42

"SO SAYING HE DREW MY SHADOW OUT OF HIS POCKET AND
STRETCHED IT OUT AT HIS FEET IN THE SUN" 50

"ALONE ON THE WILD HEATH I DISBURDENED MY HEART" 52

THE FOREST OF ANCIENT FIRS 62

"WITH SOME HESITATION HE PUT HIS HAND INTO HIS POCKET
AND DREW OUT THE ALTERED AND PALLID FORM OF MR.
JOHN" 76

THE DREAM 78

"AND SO WAS OBLIGED TO CONTENT MYSELF WITH A
SECONDHAND PAIR" 80

THE FROZEN SEA 82

"AT LAST I SAT DOWN AT THE EXTREME POINT OF LOMBOCK
LAMENTING" 86

PETER AT HOME 92


THE COLD HEART

_To face page_

DUTCH MICHAEL FELLING THE TREES 14

PETER'S DREAM 22

"HAVE YOU HAD ENOUGH, THEY ASKED HIM" 24

"PETER MUNK! WHAT ARE YOU DOING IN THE PINE GROVE" 26

"THEN IN A FLASH A MONSTROUS WOODCOCK SWEPT DOWN
FROM ABOVE AND SEIZED THE SNAKE IN ITS BEAK" 28

"YOU HAVEN'T QUITE HIT IT, CHARCOAL PETER" 30

PETER GAMBLING AT THE INN 36

"SO HERE WE ARE AT THE END OF IT ALL" 40

"THEN THE MONSTER STRETCHED FORTH AN ARM AS LONG AS A
WEAVER'S BEAM AND A HAND AS BROAD AS A LARGE
TABLE" 46

"AH, HAVE MERCY, GOOD LADY AND GIVE ME A DRINK OF
WATER" 58

"BUT SCARCELY HAD HE UTTERED THESE WORDS THAN THE
GLASS MANIKIN SUDDENLY BEGAN TO INCREASE IN SIZE
AND STATURE" 62

"AND AS HE PRAYED MICHAEL DECREASED MORE AND MORE IN
SIZE, FALLING TO THE GROUND" 68

"LOOK ONCE MORE AROUND, PETER MUNK!" 72






INTRODUCTION


LOUIS ADELBERT VON CHAMISSO

In 1813 Europe was busy watching the career of the Corsican
Giant--which was nearing its end. Having reached the summit of power,
and put his foot on the neck of Europe, Napoleon was suddenly hurled
down from his dizzy height. And yet in the midst of stirring events and
the din of arms, people found time to pay attention to important
literary productions. A curious book, "The Strange Narrative of Peter
Schlemihl," by Louis Adelbert von Chamisso, which made its first
appearance in Germany in 1813, aroused an ever increasing interest, in
spite of the distraction of the public mind, until the name of the
author became world-famous.

Chamisso was by birth a Frenchman, having been born at the castle of
Bon-Court in Champagne, on January 27, 1781.[1] On the outbreak of the
French Revolution our author left France with his parents; and in 1795
we find them in Bayreuth, which then belonged to the King of Prussia,
the Margrave of Anspach having sold the town to his Prussian Majesty in
1791. Chamisso's parents at last came to Berlin, and young Adelbert was
appointed page to Queen Louise. This famous queen, wife of Frederic
William II. and mother of Frederic William III., took a lively interest
in the young page and decided to complete his somewhat neglected
education. A commission in the army was secured for him, he was made
ensign and soon afterwards lieutenant. Napoleon having in the meantime
become First Consul, he recalled the French emigrants, and Chamisso's
parents availed themselves of the permission and returned to their
home, but they nevertheless advised their son to remain in Prussian
service. Adelbert obeyed them, although he felt far from happy in
Berlin. The service of page did not please him, and his correspondence
is full of passages revealing the melancholy state of his mind. The
court atmosphere was stifling him, and his poverty caused him a great
deal of humiliation. We see him, at that time, as a young man of a
serious and independent disposition, a dreamer and a sceptic, timid and
naive, dissatisfied with his position as page and as soldier, unhappy
in his exile, his misery and his solitude!

But at last Chamisso found consolation in work. With great ardour he
applied himself to the study of the German language and literature, and
particularly to poetry and philosophy. He learned Greek, and the Iliad
became his constant companion. Klopstock and Schiller attracted him
greatly; but he also read J. J. Rousseau, Voltaire and Diderot. He
published several poems in the language of his adopted country,
compositions distinguished by an originality of style and a peculiar
vigour. Chamisso's first work is supposed to have been "The Count de
Comminges," written in 1801 or 1802. It is not an original work, but
rather an imitation or translation of a drama from the pen of Baculard
d'Arnaud, produced in 1790. Later on he read Wieland and Goethe, and in
1803 appeared his Faust, in which the influence of the philosophy of
Fichte made itself felt. It was also in this year that love, by the
side of poetry and metaphysics, occupied the mind and heart of the
young lieutenant. Chamisso fell in love with Madame Cérès Duvernay, a
young French coquette widow, of whom--unlike Sam Weller--he did not
learn to beware. He had made her acquaintance in the salon of the
banker Ephraim, and asked her to marry him. Madame Duvernay, however,
was a practical Frenchwoman and refused the legitimate love of the poor
lieutenant! This love affair and its sad ending increased Chamisso's
melancholy and his inclination for solitude. The war with France then
broke out, and Chamisso tasted the bitterness which is so often the lot
of that unhappy product of modern civilization and political
circumstances: _the naturalized alien_! He found himself in an
anomalous position which caused him great distress, for it isolated him
among many millions. Although a naturalized German, nay, at heart
attached to Germany and animated--like so many of his _confrères_--by
the spirit of liberty--he was nevertheless of French parentage. It was
not only a question whether he should take up arms on behalf of
Germany, but also, whether he should fight against France and the
people with whom he was connected by ties of blood and family
relationship. Hence arose a struggle in his breast. "I, and I alone,"
he exclaimed in his despair, "am forbidden at this juncture to wield a
sword!" Very few people understand the tragedy of those exiles who are
compelled to seek a new home and adopt a new country which they love as
much, if not more, than the people among whom they have come to dwell.
Instead of meeting with sympathy on account of his peculiar situation,
Chamisso was frequently doomed to hear, in the Capital of Prussia, the
headquarters of the confederation against France and Napoleon,
expressions of hatred and scorn directed against his countrymen. He was
himself too fair-minded to mistake the cause of such expressions, which
were, after all, only natural in the circumstances, but they
nevertheless deeply hurt the sensitive poet when they reached his ears.

After the treaty of Tilsit had been signed by Napoleon and the King of
Prussia, Chamisso visited France, where his family regained possession
of part of their estates, and our author secured, for a short time, the
post of professor at the school at Napoléonville in the Vendée. It was
during his stay in France that Chamisso was drawn into the circle of
Madame de Stael, and he followed her to Coppet, where she had been
exiled by Napoleon in 1811. In the house of this "magnificent and
wonderful woman," as he calls her in his letters, he passed
incomparable days in the company of August Wilhelm von Schlegel, Madame
Récamier and other celebrities.



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