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THE WORKS OF
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

VOLUME II


_Of this SWANSTON EDITION in Twenty-five
Volumes of the Works of ROBERT LOUIS
STEVENSON Two Thousand and Sixty Copies
have been printed, of which only Two Thousand
Copies are for sale._

_This is No. ......_




[Illustration: THE SILVERADO SQUATTERS
(_From a Drawing by Mr. J. D. Strong_)]




THE WORKS OF

ROBERT LOUIS
STEVENSON



VOLUME TWO



LONDON : PUBLISHED BY CHATTO AND
WINDUS : IN ASSOCIATION WITH CASSELL
AND COMPANY LIMITED : WILLIAM
HEINEMANN : AND LONGMANS GREEN
AND COMPANY MDCCCCXI




ALL RIGHTS RESERVED




CONTENTS


THE AMATEUR EMIGRANT

PART I.--FROM THE CLYDE TO SANDY HOOK


PAGE
THE SECOND CABIN 7
EARLY IMPRESSIONS 15
STEERAGE SCENES 24
STEERAGE TYPES 32
THE SICK MAN 43
THE STOWAWAYS 53
PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AND REVIEW 66
NEW YORK 77


PART II.--ACROSS THE PLAINS

NOTES BY THE WAY TO COUNCIL BLUFFS 93
THE EMIGRANT TRAIN 107
THE PLAINS OF NEBRASKA 115
THE DESERT OF WYOMING 119
FELLOW PASSENGERS 124
DESPISED RACES 129
TO THE GOLDEN GATES 133


THE OLD AND NEW PACIFIC CAPITALS

I. MONTEREY 141
II. SAN FRANCISCO 159


THE SILVERADO SQUATTERS

THE SILVERADO SQUATTERS 173
IN THE VALLEY:
I. CALISTOGA 179
II. THE PETRIFIED FOREST 184
III. NAPA WINE 188
IV. THE SCOT ABROAD 194
WITH THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL:
I. TO INTRODUCE MR. KELMAR 201
II. FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF SILVERADO 205
III. THE RETURN 215
THE ACT OF SQUATTING 221
THE HUNTER'S FAMILY 230
THE SEA-FOGS 239
THE TOLL HOUSE 245
A STARRY DRIVE 250
EPISODES IN THE STORY OF A MINE 254
TOILS AND PLEASURES 264


"VIRGINIBUS PUERISQUE" AND OTHER PAPERS

I. "VIRGINIBUS PUERISQUE":
I. 281
II. 292
III. ON FALLING IN LOVE 302
IV. TRUTH OF INTERCOURSE 311
II. CRABBED AGE AND YOUTH 321
III. AN APOLOGY FOR IDLERS 334
IV. ORDERED SOUTH 345
V. ĘS TRIPLEX 358
VI. EL DORADO 368
VII. THE ENGLISH ADMIRALS 372
VIII. SOME PORTRAITS BY RAEBURN 385
IX. CHILD'S PLAY 394
X. WALKING TOURS 406
XI. PAN'S PIPES 415
XII. A PLEA FOR GAS LAMPS 420




THE AMATEUR EMIGRANT




_TO
ROBERT ALAN MOWBRAY STEVENSON_

_Our friendship was not only founded before we were born by a community
of blood, but is in itself near as old as my life. It began with our
early ages, and, like a history, has been continued to the present time.
Although we may not be old in the world, we are old to each other,
having so long been intimates. We are now widely separated, a great sea
and continent intervening; but memory, like care, mounts into iron ships
and rides post behind the horseman. Neither time nor space nor enmity
can conquer old affection; and as I dedicate these sketches, it is not
to you only, but to all in the old country, that I send the greeting of
my heart._

1879. _R. L. S._




PART I

FROM THE CLYDE TO SANDY HOOK




THE AMATEUR EMIGRANT

THE SECOND CABIN


I first encountered my fellow-passengers on the Broomielaw in Glasgow.
Thence we descended the Clyde in no familiar spirit, but looking askance
on each other as on possible enemies. A few Scandinavians, who had
already grown acquainted on the North Sea, were friendly and voluble
over their long pipes; but among English speakers distance and suspicion
reigned supreme. The sun was soon overclouded, the wind freshened and
grew sharp as we continued to descend the widening estuary; and with the
falling temperature the gloom among the passengers increased. Two of the
women wept. Any one who had come aboard might have supposed we were all
absconding from the law. There was scarce a word interchanged, and no
common sentiment but that of cold united us, until at length, having
touched at Greenock, a pointing arm and rush to the starboard bow
announced that our ocean steamer was in sight. There she lay in
mid-river, at the tail of the Bank, her sea-signal flying: a wall of
bulwark, a street of white deck-houses, an aspiring forest of spars,
larger than a church, and soon to be as populous as many an incorporated
town in the land to which she was to bear us.

I was not, in truth, a steerage passenger. Although anxious to see the
worst of emigrant life, I had some work to finish on the voyage, and was
advised to go by the second cabin, where at least I should have a table
at command. The advice was excellent; but to understand the choice, and
what I gained, some outline of the internal disposition of the ship will
first be necessary. In her very nose is Steerage No. 1, down two pair of
stairs. A little abaft, another companion, labelled Steerage No. 2 and
3, gives admission to three galleries, two running forward towards
steerage No. 1, and the third aft towards the engines. The starboard
forward gallery is the second cabin. Away abaft the engines and below
the officers' cabins, to complete our survey of the vessel, there is yet
a third nest of steerages, labelled 4 and 5. The second cabin, to
return, is thus a modified oasis in the very heart of the steerages.
Through the thin partition you can hear the steerage passengers being
sick, the rattle of tin dishes as they sit at meals, the varied accents
in which they converse, the crying of their children terrified by this
new experience, or the clean flat smack of the parental hand in
chastisement.

There are, however, many advantages for the inhabitant of this strip. He
does not require to bring his own bedding or dishes, but finds berths
and a table completely if somewhat roughly furnished. He enjoys a
distinct superiority in diet; but this, strange to say, differs not only
on different ships, but on the same ship according as her head is to the
east or west. In my own experience, the principal difference between our
table and that of the true steerage passenger was the table itself, and
the crockery plates from which we ate. But lest I should show myself
ungrateful, let me recapitulate every advantage. At breakfast we had a
choice between tea and coffee for beverage; a choice not easy to make,
the two were so surprisingly alike. I found that I could sleep after the
coffee and lay awake after the tea; which is proof conclusive of some
chemical disparity; and even by the palate I could distinguish a smack
of snuff in the former from a flavour of boiling and dish-cloths in the
second. As a matter of fact, I have seen passengers, after many sips,
still doubting which had been supplied them. In the way of eatables at
the same meal we were gloriously favoured; for in addition to porridge,
which was common to all, we had Irish stew, sometimes a bit of fish, and
sometimes rissoles. The dinner of soup, roast fresh beef, boiled salt
junk, and potatoes was, I believe, exactly common to the steerage and
the second cabin; only I have heard it rumoured that our potatoes were
of a superior brand; and twice a week, on pudding days, instead of duff,
we had a saddle-bag filled with currants under the name of a
plum-pudding. At tea we were served with some broken meat from the
saloon; sometimes in the comparatively elegant form of spare patties or
rissoles; but as a general thing mere chicken-bones and flakes of fish,
neither hot nor cold. If these were not the scrapings of plates their
looks belied them sorely; yet we were all too hungry to be proud, and
fell to these leavings greedily.



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