A B C D E F
G H I J K L M 

Total read books on site:
more than 10 000

You can read its for free!


Text on one page: Few Medium Many
(This file was produced from images generously made
available by The Internet Archive/American Libraries.)









[Illustration: WALDEMAR DAA AND HIS DAUGHTERS. p. 122.]



WHAT THE MOON SAW:

AND OTHER TALES.




BY

HANS C. ANDERSEN.


TRANSLATED BY

H. W. DULCKEN, PH.D.


WITH EIGHTY ILLUSTRATIONS BY A. W. BAYES,

ENGRAVED BY THE BROTHERS DALZIEL.






LONDON:

GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS,

BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL.

1866.

* * * * *




_Uniform with_ "WHAT THE MOON SAW, and Other Tales," _price 5s.,
extra cloth, on fine toned paper_,

STORIES AND TALES

BY

HANS C. ANDERSEN.

TRANSLATED BY H. W. DULCKEN, PH.D.

EIGHTY ILLUSTRATIONS BY A. W. BAYES.

ENGRAVED BY THE BROTHERS DALZIEL.

*** _The two volumes,_ "STORIES AND TALES" _and_ "WHAT THE MOON SAW,"
_form the most complete collection of_ HANS C. ANDERSEN'S _Tales
published in this country._

* * * * *




PREFACE.


The present book is put forth as a sequel to the volume of HANS C.
ANDERSEN'S "Stories and Tales," published in a similar form in the
course of 1864. It contains tales and sketches various in character;
and following, as it does, an earlier volume, care has been taken to
intersperse with the children's tales stories which, by their graver
character and deeper meaning, are calculated to interest those
"children of a larger growth" who can find instruction as well as
amusement in the play of fancy and imagination, though the realm be
that of fiction, and the instruction be conveyed in a simple form.

The series of sketches of "What the Moon Saw," with which the present
volume opens, arose from the experiences of ANDERSEN, when as a youth
he went to seek his fortune in the capital of his native land; and the
story entitled "Under the Willow Tree" is said likewise to have its
foundation in fact; indeed, it seems redolent of the truth of that
natural human love and suffering which is so truly said to "make the
whole world kin."

On the preparation and embellishment of the book, the same care and
attention have been lavished as on the preceding volume. The pencil of
Mr. BAYES and the graver of the BROTHERS DALZIEL have again been
employed in the work of illustration; and it is hoped that the favour
bestowed by the public on the former volume may be extended to this
its successor.

H. W. D.

* * * * *




CONTENTS.


PAGE

What the Moon Saw 1

The Story of the Year 40

She was Good for Nothing 48

"There is a Difference" 55

Everything in its Right Place 59

The Goblin and the Huckster 66

In a Thousand Years 70

The Bond of Friendship 72

Jack the Dullard. An Old Story told Anew 81

Something 86

Under the Willow Tree 92

The Beetle 107

What the Old Man does is always Right 114

The Wind tells about Waldemar Daa and his Daughters 120

Ib and Christine 130

Ole the Tower-Keeper 142

The Bottle-Neck 151

Good Humour 161

A Leaf from the Sky 165

The Dumb Book 168

The Jewish Girl 171

The Thorny Road of Honour 176

The Old Gravestone 180

The Old Bachelor's Nightcap 184

The Marsh King's Daughter 196

The Last Dream of the Old Oak Tree. A Christmas Tale 238

The Bell-deep 244

The Puppet Showman 247

The Pigs 251

Anne Lisbeth 254

Charming 265

In the Duck-yard 272

The Girl who Trod on the Loaf 277

A Story from the Sand-dunes 285

The Bishop of Börglum and his Warriors 316

The Snow Man 323

Two Maidens 328

The Farmyard Cock and the Weathercock 330

The Pen and Inkstand 332

The Child in the Grave 334

Soup on a Sausage-Peg 339

The Stone of the Wise Men 353

The Butterfly 367

In the Uttermost Parts of the Sea 369

The Phoenix Bird 371

* * * * *




WHAT THE MOON SAW.

[Illustration: MY POST OF OBSERVATION.]

INTRODUCTION.


It is a strange thing, that when I feel most fervently and most
deeply, my hands and my tongue seem alike tied, so that I cannot
rightly describe or accurately portray the thoughts that are rising
within me; and yet I am a painter: my eye tells me as much as that,
and all my friends who have seen my sketches and fancies say the same.

I am a poor lad, and live in one of the narrowest of lanes; but I do
not want for light, as my room is high up in the house, with an
extensive prospect over the neighbouring roofs. During the first few
days I went to live in the town, I felt low-spirited and solitary
enough. Instead of the forest and the green hills of former days, I
had here only a forest of chimney-pots to look out upon. And then I
had not a single friend; not one familiar face greeted me.

So one evening I sat at the window, in a desponding mood; and
presently I opened the casement and looked out. Oh, how my heart
leaped up with joy! Here was a well-known face at last--a round,
friendly countenance, the face of a good friend I had known at home.
In, fact it was the MOON that looked in upon me. He was quite
unchanged, the dear old Moon, and had the same face exactly that he
used to show when he peered down upon me through the willow trees on
the moor. I kissed my hand to him over and over again, as he shone far
into my little room; and he, for his part, promised me that every
evening, when he came abroad, he would look in upon me for a few
moments. This promise he has faithfully kept. It is a pity that he can
only stay such a short time when he comes. Whenever he appears, he
tells me of one thing or another that he has seen on the previous
night, or on that same evening. "Just paint the scenes I describe to
you"--this is what he said to me--"and you will have a very pretty
picture-book." I have followed his injunction for many evenings. I
could make up a new "Thousand and One Nights," in my own way, out of
these pictures, but the number might be too great, after all. The
pictures I have here given have not been chosen at random, but follow
in their proper order, just as they were described to me. Some great
gifted painter, or some poet or musician, may make something more of
them if he likes; what I have given here are only hasty sketches,
hurriedly put upon the paper, with some of my own thoughts
interspersed; for the Moon did not come to me every evening--a cloud
sometimes hid his face from me.

[Illustration: THE INDIAN GIRL.]


FIRST EVENING.

"Last night"--I am quoting the Moon's own words--"last night I was
gliding through the cloudless Indian sky. My face was mirrored in the
waters of the Ganges, and my beams strove to pierce through the thick
intertwining boughs of the bananas, arching beneath me like the
tortoise's shell. Forth from the thicket tripped a Hindoo maid, light
as a gazelle, beautiful as Eve. Airy and ethereal as a vision, and yet
sharply defined amid the surrounding shadows, stood this daughter of
Hindostan: I could read on her delicate brow the thought that had
brought her hither. The thorny creeping plants tore her sandals, but
for all that she came rapidly forward. The deer that had come down to
the river to quench their thirst, sprang by with a startled bound, for
in her hand the maiden bore a lighted lamp. I could see the blood in
her delicate finger tips, as she spread them for a screen before the
dancing flame. She came down to the stream, and set the lamp upon the
water, and let it float away. The flame flickered to and fro, and
seemed ready to expire; but still the lamp burned on, and the girl's
black sparkling eyes, half veiled behind their long silken lashes,
followed it with a gaze of earnest intensity. She knew that if the
lamp continued to burn so long as she could keep it in sight, her
betrothed was still alive; but if the lamp was suddenly extinguished,
he was dead. And the lamp burned bravely on, and she fell on her
knees, and prayed. Near her in the grass lay a speckled snake, but she
heeded it not--she thought only of Bramah and of her betrothed. 'He
lives!' she shouted joyfully, 'he lives!' And from the mountains the
echo came back upon her, 'he lives!'"

[Illustration: THE LITTLE GIRL AND THE CHICKENS.]


SECOND EVENING.

"Yesterday," said the Moon to me, "I looked down upon a small
courtyard surrounded on all sides by houses.



Pages: | 1 | | 2 | | 3 | | 4 | | 5 | | 6 | | 7 | | 8 | | 9 | | 10 | | 11 | | 12 | | 13 | | 14 | | 15 | | 16 | | 17 | | 18 | | 19 | | 20 | | 21 | | 22 | | 23 | | 24 | | 25 | | 26 | | 27 | | 28 | | 29 | | 30 | | 31 | | 32 | | 33 | | 34 | | 35 | | 36 | | 37 | | 38 | | 39 | | 40 | | 41 | | 42 | | 43 | | 44 | | 45 | | 46 | | 47 | | 48 | | 49 | | 50 | | 51 | | 52 | | 53 | | 54 | | 55 | | 56 | | 57 | | 58 | | 59 | | 60 | | 61 | | 62 | | 63 | | 64 | | 65 | | 66 | | 67 | | 68 | | 69 | | 70 | | 71 | | 72 | | 73 | | 74 | | 75 | | 76 | | 77 | | 78 | | 79 | | 80 | | Next |

N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z 

Your last read book:

You dont read books at this site.