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_SPECIAL EDITION_

WITH THE WORLD'S
GREAT TRAVELLERS

EDITED BY CHARLES MORRIS
AND OLIVER H. G. LEIGH

Vol. I

CHICAGO
UNION BOOK COMPANY
1901




COPYRIGHT 1896 AND 1897
BY
J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY

COPYRIGHT 1901
E. R. DUMONT




[Illustration: THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN
PAINTING BY SPADA]




CONTENTS.


SUBJECT. AUTHOR. PAGE

New Dependencies of the United States OLIVER H. G. LEIGH 9
Winter and Summer in New England HARRIET MARTINEAU 22
Niagara Falls and the Thousand Islands CHARLES MORRIS 31
From New York to Washington in 1866 HENRY LATHAM 39
The Natural Bridge and Tunnel of EDWARD A. POLLARD 49
Virginia
Plantation Life in War Times WILLIAM HOWARD RUSSELL 62
Among Florida Alligators S. C. CLARKE 74
In the Mammoth Cave THÉRÈSE YELVERTON 83
Down the Ohio and Mississippi THOMAS L. NICHOLS 94
From New Orleans to Red River FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED 104
Winter on the Prairies G. W. FEATHERSTONHAUGH 114
A Hunter's Christmas Dinner J. S. CAMPION 124
A Colorado "Round-Up" ALFRED TERRY BACON 133
Among the Cow-boys LOUIS C. BRADFORD 141
Hunting the Buffalo WASHINGTON IRVING 147
In the Country of the Sioux MERIWETHER LEWIS 157
The Great Falls of the Missouri WILLIAM CLARKE 168
Hunting Scenes in Canadian Woods B. A. WATSON 178
The Grand Falls of Labrador HENRY G. BRYANT 189
Life Among the Esquimaux WILLIAM EDWARD PARRY 200
Fugitives from the Arctic Seas ELISHA KENT KANE 210
Rescued from Death W. S. SCHLEY 220
The Muir Glacier SEPTIMA M. COLLIS 230
A Summer Trip to Alaska JAMES A. HARRISON 239
The Fort William Henry Massacre JONATHAN CARVER 249
The Gaucho and His Horse THOMAS J. HUTCHINSON 257
Valparaiso and Its Vicinity CHARLES DARWIN 265
An Escape from Captivity BENJAMIN F. BOURNE 274




List of Illustrations

VOLUME I


THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN _Frontispiece_
MORRO CASTLE, HAVANA 14
WASHINGTON ELM, CAMBRIDGE 28
NEW YORK AND THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE 42
ON THE COAST OF FLORIDA 78
SUNRISE FROM THE SUMMIT OF PIKE'S PEAK 134
A KANSAS CYCLONE 144
THE CATSKILLS--SUNRISE FROM SOUTH MOUNTAIN 180
PARLIAMENT HOUSES, OTTAWA 198
WINTER IN THE FAR NORTH 214
MUIR GLACIER, ALASKA 236




PREFACE.


Next to actual travel, the reading of first-class travel stories by men
and women of genius is the finest aid to the broadening of views and
enlargement of useful knowledge of men and the world's ways. It is the
highest form of intellectual recreation, with the advantage over
fiction-reading of satisfying the wholesome desire for facts. With all
our modern enthusiasm for long journeys and foreign travel, now so easy
of accomplishment, we see but very little of the great world. The fact
that ocean voyages are now called mere "trips" has not made us
over-familiar with even our own kinsfolk in our new dependencies.
Foreign peoples and lands are still strange to us. Tropic and Arctic
lands are as far apart in condition as ever; Europe differs from Asia,
America from Africa, as markedly as ever. Man still presents every grade
of development, from the lowest savagery to the highest civilization,
and our interest in the marvels of nature and art, the variety of plant
and animal life, and the widely varied habits and conditions, modes of
thought and action, of mankind, is in no danger of losing its zest.

These considerations have guided us in our endeavor to tell the story of
the world, alike of its familiar and unfamiliar localities, as displayed
in the narratives of those who have seen its every part. Special
interest attaches to the stories of those travellers who first gazed
upon the wonders and observed the inhabitants of previously unknown
lands, and whose descriptions are therefore those of discoverers.

One indisputable advantage belongs to this work over the average record
of travel: the reader is not tied down to the perusal of a one-man book.
He has the privilege of calling at pleasure upon any one of these
eminent travellers to recount his or her exploit, with the certainty of
finding they are all in their happiest vein and tell their best stories.

The adventures and discoveries here described are gathered from the four
quarters of the globe, and include the famous stories of men no longer
living, as well as those of present activity. Many of the articles were
formerly published in the exhaustive work entitled, "The World's Library
of Literature, History and Travel" [The J. B. Lippincott Co.,
Philadelphia].

For the rich variety and quality of our material we are indebted to
many travellers of note, and to the courtesy of numerous publishers
and authors. Among these it is desired to acknowledge particularly
indebtedness to the following publishers and works: To Harper and
Brothers, for selections from Stanley's "Through the Dark Continent," Du
Chaillu's "Equatorial Africa," Prime's "Tent-Life in the Holy Land,"
Orton's "The Andes and the Amazon," and Browne's "An American Family in
Germany." To Charles Scribner's Sons: Stanley's "In Darkest Africa,"
Field's "The Greek Islands," and Schley's "The Rescue of Greely." To G.
P. Putnam's Sons: De Amicis's "Holland and its People," Taylor's "Lands
of the Saracens," and Brace's "The New West." To Houghton, Mifflin and
Co.: Melville's "In the Lena Delta," and Hawthorne's "Our Old Home." To
Roberts Brothers: Hunt's "Bits of Travel at Home." To H. C. Coates and
Co.: Leonowen's "Life and Travel in India." Equal tribute is offered to
the authors who have courteously permitted the use of their material,
and in these acknowledgments we include Charles Morris, editor of the
above work, and Oliver H. G. Leigh, whose pen has won honors in various
fields, for their special contributions to this edition.




WITH THE WORLD'S
GREAT TRAVELLERS.




NEW DEPENDENCIES OF THE UNITED STATES.

OLIVER H. G LEIGH.

[The trend of events makes it certain that our geographical
knowledge is going to be enlarged by personal investigation.
The boom of Dewey's big guns sent us to our school-books with
mixed feelings as to the practical value of much of our alleged
learning. The world suddenly broadened as we gazed in surprise.
Hawaii invited itself into the circle of new relations. The
near West Indies and the remote Philippines craved peculiar
attentions. Whether moved by commercial zeal, official duty
or the profitable curiosity of pleasure or scientific
investigation, he is in the highest sense a patriotic
benefactor of his own country and the land he visits, who
devotes his energies to making Americans more intimately
acquainted with the communities now linked with the most
powerful of nations.]


The scope of holiday travel, or tours of profitable investigation, has
been widely extended by the new relationship between the United States
and Hawaii, now included in its possessions, and the former Spanish
islands over which it exercises a kindly protectorate. Through the usual
channels public sentiment is being formed upon the resources and
responsibilities of the new dependencies. Many will be attracted to
Cuba, Porto Rico, Hawaii, and even to the remote Philippines, by
considerations of a practical kind. No truer patriotic motive can
inspire the American traveller than the desire to develop the natural
resources, and, by consequence, the social welfare of a dependent
community Whether bent on business, pleasure, or official duty in the
service of the United States the prospective voyager, and the friends he
leaves behind him, will profit by these gatherings from the impressions
and experiences of former travellers.

The approach to Havana at daybreak overwhelms the senses with the
gorgeous beauties of the sky and landscape. Foul as the harbor may be
with city drainage it seems a silvery lake encircled with the charms of
Paradise and over-arched with indescribable glories of celestial forms
and hues and ever-changing witcheries wrought by the frolicsome sun in
his ecstasy of morning release. Strange that where nature most lavishes
her wealth of charms and favors, the listlessness of perverse man
responds in ungrateful contrasts rather than in harmonies. Havana
has the interest of age, with the drawbacks incident to hereditary
indifference to progressive change. As in all important cities there are
sharp contrasts in its quarters. With long avenues of stately mansions,
marble-like and colonnaded, and exquisitely designed courtyards, there
are unpaved thoroughfares with an open sewer in the mid-roadway, flanked
by tenement houses with a family in each room. Most of Havana's two
hundred thousand citizens live in one-story buildings, lacking
conveniences which the poorest American considers necessities. The older
streets are mere alleys, about twenty feet wide, of which the sidewalks
take up seven. Light and ample ventilation are obtained by grated
window-openings without frames or glass. The dwellings and public
buildings throughout Cuba are planned to give free passage to every
zephyr that wafts relief from the oppressive heat.



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