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_SPECIAL EDITION_

WITH THE WORLD'S
GREAT TRAVELLERS

EDITED BY CHARLES MORRIS
AND OLIVER H. G. LEIGH

VOL. II

CHICAGO
UNION BOOK COMPANY
1901




COPYRIGHT 1896 AND 1897
BY
J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY

COPYRIGHT 1901
E. R. DUMONT




[Illustration: BOSTON COMMON, BOSTON, MASS.]




CONTENTS.


SUBJECT. AUTHOR. PAGE

New York, Washington, Chicago OLIVER H. G. LEIGH 5
Winnipeg Lake and River W. F. BUTLER 21
A Fine Scenic Route HENRY T. FINCK 31
South Pass and Fremont's Park JOHN C. FREMONT 42
In the Yellowstone Park FERDINAND V. HAYDEN 49
The Country of the Cliff-Dwellers ALFRED TERRY BACON 58
Lake Tahoe and the Big Trees A. H. TEVIS 68
The Chinese Quarter in San Francisco HELEN HUNT JACKSON 78
Mariposa Grove and Yosemite Valley CHARLES LORING BRACE 88
A Sportsman's Experience in Mexico SIR ROSE LAMBERT PRICE 99
The Scenery of the Mexican Lowlands FELIX L. OSWALD 108
Among the Ruins of Yucatan JOHN L. STEPHENS 119
The Route of the Nicaragua Canal JULIUS FROEBEL 130
The Destruction of San Salvador CARL SCHERZER 137
Scenes in Trinidad and Jamaica JAMES ANTHONY FROUDE 145
The High Woods of Trinidad CHARLES KINGSLEY 157
Animals of British Guiana C. BARRINGTON BROWN 169
Life and Scenery in Venezuela ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT 179
The Llaneros of Venezuela RAMON PAEZ 190
The Forests of the Amazon and Madeira
Rivers FRANZ KELLER 200
Canoe- and Camp-Life on the Madeira FRANZ KELLER 212
Besieged by Peccaries JAMES W. WELLS 219
The Perils of Travel IDA PFEIFFER 232
Brazilian Ants and Monkeys HENRY W. BATES 240
The Monarchs of the Andes JAMES ORTON 251
Inca High-Roads and Bridges E. GEORGE SQUIER 261




List of Illustrations

VOLUME II

BOSTON COMMON, BOSTON, MASS. _Frontispiece_
PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, WASHINGTON 14
MEMORIAL MONUMENT TO SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN, FOUNDER OF
QUEBEC 34
THE UPPER YELLOWSTONE FALLS 50
GRAND CAŅON, ARIZONA 66
RED WOOD TREE, CALIFORNIA 96
REGINA ANGELORUM (Queen of the Angels) 116
A WATERFALL IN THE TROPICS 146
LA GUAYRA, VENEZUELA 180
A SOUTH SEA ISLAND 214
THE MONARCHS OF THE ANDES 252




WITH THE WORLD'S
GREAT TRAVELLERS.




THE WORLD'S GREAT CAPITALS OF TO-DAY.

OLIVER H. G. LEIGH.


NEW YORK, WASHINGTON, CHICAGO.

The reflective voyager, on his first sight of New York, is baffled when
he attempts to catalogue his sensations. All is so completely in
contrast with the capitals of Europe. The gloriously bright sky, air
that drinks like champagne, the resultant springiness of life and
movement, that overdoes itself in excitement and premature exhaustion,
and the obtrusively visible defects of this surface enthusiasm,
monotonous streets, unfinished or unbegun city improvements, and the
conspicuous lack of play-spaces for children--this is the rough
portrait sketch New York draws of itself for the newcomer. It does not
disguise the fact that money-making was for many years the dominant
consideration. The city was laid out for business, and public comfort
had to look out for itself. The workers, the poor, and the helpless were
apparently overlooked.

But there are at least three New Yorks to explore. Old New York
stretches from the bay up to once aristocratic Madison Square, and this
is the section that first leaves its mark on the aforesaid visitor. Then
comes new New York, the splendid modern metropolis that spreads from
Central Park along the Hudson to the northern heights where the stately
mausoleum of Grant, the transplanted Columbia University, and the great
Cathedral-to-be add majestic dignity to the grandly picturesque panorama
by the river. The antiquated brownstone wilderness of fashionable houses
blossoms into white and gray and red clusters of mansions, richly varied
in form and treatment, with the welcome grassy settings so pitifully
missing in the older quarter. From a neglected span of prairie ground,
pimpled with bare rocks and goat-sheltering shanties also shared by dago
families, this section has in a few years qualified itself to rival the
famous features of old-world cities. A nobler prospect than Riverside
Drive alongside the mighty Hudson cannot be desired nor found. At
last the city has discovered and worthily utilized its splendid
opportunities. Then, thirdly, there is Greater New York. For the
simplification of local government it is doubtless excellent policy for
London and New York to lasso their humbler neighbor towns that the big
cities may pose as suddenly greater than ever. The thing is done with a
stroke of the pen and does not wound the pride of the newly scooped-in
citizens, because the individuality of the suburban districts remains
unchanged, but in our infantile capacity as mere sightseers the
side-shows do not affect the glories of the ring proper. If this fashion
of acquiring greatness continues, being inclusion rather than expansion,
there need be no limit to the ciphers periodically tacked on to the
population of the world's swarming hives. Now that New York is growing,
it might drop its insignificant borrowed name and assume its rightful
one of dignity and historic import, Manhattan. It fills the twenty-two
square miles between Harlem river, the Hudson, the East River, and the
bay, which area is Manhattan Island. North of the Harlem it includes
the district of the Bronx, a little stream which for half a mile or
so affords as exquisite a picture of nature's beauty as can be found
anywhere. The drift from town to country homes is a sign of the times
and an augury of great good to the coming generation, physical and
patriotic. After all, bricks and mortar are not the making of a city.
New York is at its best beyond the borders. Its rich citizens overflow
into these northern suburbs and lordly estates, and across the East
River into Brooklyn and Long Island's garden villages, and across the
Hudson into New Jersey's charming towns, and down the bay to Staten
Island. In no great metropolis this side of Constantinople is it so easy
and inexpensive to slip quickly from the office or home and enjoy the
bracing delights of a sail down the salt water (the upper bay has
fourteen square miles and the lower over eighty) or up a stately river
with all the charms of the Hudson. Everything is on the grand scale,
once the city's square blocks of barracky houses are left behind.

Old-world quietists are surprised to discover one cosy quarter, perhaps
two, in the grimy section of New York. Stuyvesant Square and its
immediate belongings around St. George's Church still survive as an
oasis of sweetness and light in a wilderness of dismal commonplace.
Washington Square carries somewhat of the old aristocratic flavor to
the borders of Bohemia, and the Theological College in Chelsea used
to give a solemnizing leaven to that changing district. The social
transformation is still in progress. It may, perhaps, be a token of the
rise to metropolitanism that the distinctively American hotels of the
old-fashioned type have virtually disappeared. European models have
the preference for the time being in the in- and outdoor life of New
Yorkers. English sports have apparently taken firm root, as seen in the
popularity of golf, football, horse-racing, rowing, and some less
desirable practices incident to one or two of these erstwhile sports
that have developed into business undertakings, to the regret of true
sportsmen. In this connection it is worth while to notice the striking
disparity in the sizes of the audiences and outdoor crowds of New York
and London. If fifteen thousand people pay to see the Harvard-Yale
football game, or other such sport, it is considered worthy of special
headlines in the papers. Madison Square Garden holds that number,
seated, but the occasions when it has been filled at meetings have been
few. Football crowds in England range from thirty up to seventy
thousand, by turnstile record. The Crystal Palace accommodates over one
hundred thousand holiday-makers without being crowded, in its central
nave, sixteen hundred feet by eighty, besides transepts, and its famous
grounds. The late Rev. C. H. Spurgeon had congregations of six thousand,
seated, twice each Sunday for twenty-eight years. Mr. Gladstone and
others have addressed twenty-five thousand in the Agricultural Hall,
which covers over three acres, and St. Paul's Cathedral has occasional
congregations of over twenty thousand. These facts are the more curious
as applying to a small country.

One explanation of this contrast lies in the fact that New York is not a
homogeneous community. In a more marked degree than other capitals it is
a congeries of towns and colonies, largely alien in sympathies. You can
wander in turn through Judea, China, Italy, Ireland, France, Russia,
Poland, Germany, Holland, and colored colonies. Local color is strong
in each. The English speech is not used, not known, by many of these
people. The picturesqueness of tenement life and its Babel sounds does
not atone for the want of the deep-rooted Americanism which must sooner
or later be the test of welcome immigration.

Broadway is one of the great streets of the world though really a
Narrow-way for so important a thoroughfare.



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